Difference between revisions of "Gill1998"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Virginia Teas Gill; |Title=Doing attributions in medical interaction: Patients' explanations for illness and doctors' responses |Tag(s)...")
 
 
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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
|Author(s)=Virginia Teas Gill;  
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|Author(s)=Virginia Teas Gill;
 
|Title=Doing attributions in medical interaction: Patients' explanations for illness and doctors' responses
 
|Title=Doing attributions in medical interaction: Patients' explanations for illness and doctors' responses
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Medical EMCA; Attributions; Explanations
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Medical EMCA; Attributions; Explanations
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|Journal=Social Psychology Quarterly
 
|Journal=Social Psychology Quarterly
 
|Volume=61
 
|Volume=61
|Pages=322-360
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|Number=4
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|Pages=322–360
 
|URL=http://www.jstor.org/stable/2787034
 
|URL=http://www.jstor.org/stable/2787034
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|DOI=10.2307/2787034
 
|Abstract=This paper presents an analysis of the process of offering and responding to attributions in social interaction. Analyses of audio and video recordings of patients' visits to an outpatient general internal medicine clinic reveal the ways in which patients offer their own explanations for their health problems, and how doctors respond to these explanations. In these explanation-response sequences, patients and doctors collaboratively enact an asymmetrical social organization wherein patients are authorities about their experiences but not about why their health problems occur. Patients exhibit caution when they offer explanations; they downplay their knowledge and they avoid setting themselves up for sidaffiliative responses. Patients do not compel doctors to interrupt information gathering to assess their explanations. Doctors take these opportunities to focus on patients' symptoms. Patients' authority is thus restricted to the empirical realm rather than encompassing the analysis of empirical facts.
 
|Abstract=This paper presents an analysis of the process of offering and responding to attributions in social interaction. Analyses of audio and video recordings of patients' visits to an outpatient general internal medicine clinic reveal the ways in which patients offer their own explanations for their health problems, and how doctors respond to these explanations. In these explanation-response sequences, patients and doctors collaboratively enact an asymmetrical social organization wherein patients are authorities about their experiences but not about why their health problems occur. Patients exhibit caution when they offer explanations; they downplay their knowledge and they avoid setting themselves up for sidaffiliative responses. Patients do not compel doctors to interrupt information gathering to assess their explanations. Doctors take these opportunities to focus on patients' symptoms. Patients' authority is thus restricted to the empirical realm rather than encompassing the analysis of empirical facts.
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 07:58, 20 October 2019

Gill1998
BibType ARTICLE
Key Gill1998
Author(s) Virginia Teas Gill
Title Doing attributions in medical interaction: Patients' explanations for illness and doctors' responses
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Medical EMCA, Attributions, Explanations
Publisher
Year 1998
Language
City
Month
Journal Social Psychology Quarterly
Volume 61
Number 4
Pages 322–360
URL Link
DOI 10.2307/2787034
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the process of offering and responding to attributions in social interaction. Analyses of audio and video recordings of patients' visits to an outpatient general internal medicine clinic reveal the ways in which patients offer their own explanations for their health problems, and how doctors respond to these explanations. In these explanation-response sequences, patients and doctors collaboratively enact an asymmetrical social organization wherein patients are authorities about their experiences but not about why their health problems occur. Patients exhibit caution when they offer explanations; they downplay their knowledge and they avoid setting themselves up for sidaffiliative responses. Patients do not compel doctors to interrupt information gathering to assess their explanations. Doctors take these opportunities to focus on patients' symptoms. Patients' authority is thus restricted to the empirical realm rather than encompassing the analysis of empirical facts.

Notes