Urbanik2020

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Urbanik2020
BibType ARTICLE
Key Urbanik2020
Author(s) Paweł Urbanik
Title Getting others to share goods in Polish and Norwegian: Material and moral anchors for request conventions
Editor(s)
Tag(s) Interactional Linguistics, EMCA, Polish, Norwegian, Requests, Imperatives, Interrogatives, Sharing goods, Action Formation
Publisher De Gruyter Mouton
Year 2020
Language English
City Berlin, Boston
Month
Journal Intercultural Pragmatics
Volume 17
Number 2
Pages 177-220
URL Link
DOI 10.1515/ip-2020-0009
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

The paper examines the formation of requests for sharing goods in Polish and Norwegian by focusing on the use of imperatives and Can I-interrogatives in informal settings. The study first identifies the contextual, material and embodied configurations that contribute to the selection of constructions. Then, it explores the moral roots of the divergent use of formats in similar configurations across the two languages. Employing a multimodal interactional-linguistic approach to comparable conversational data from Polish and Norwegian reality show corpora, the study demonstrates that the selection of format relies on the object’s control status and the requester’s orientation to contingencies. Imperatives are selected when the object is controlled by the requestee and no contingencies are recognized. Can I-interrogatives mark orientation to contingencies and have two realization patterns: Depending on whether the object is controlled by the requestee or not, they are used as transfer or permission requests, respectively. The study also reveals cultural differences in the selection of imperatives and transfer interrogatives across the languages. The Polish participants most often treated sharing as the requestee’s social obligation, using imperatives in the environments in which their Norwegian counterparts chose transfer interrogatives and marked that the requestee’s readiness to share was not taken for granted.

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