Keisanen-etal2017

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Keisanen-etal2017
BibType ARTICLE
Key Keisanen-etal2017
Author(s) Tiina Keisanena, Mirka Rauniomaa, Pauliina Siitonena
Title Transitions as sites of socialization in family interaction outdoors
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Parent-child interactions, Family Interaction, Socialization
Publisher
Year 2017
Language English
City
Month
Journal Learning, Culture and Social Interaction
Volume 14
Number
Pages 24-37
URL
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2017.05.001
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this study, we adopt the micro-level approach to explore the situated design and accomplishment of transitions in mundane social interaction between family members. We pay close attention to how participants construct their actions with language and their body and by drawing on the surrounding material resources. We show that transitions are important in establishing an appropriate orientation to an ongoing activity and participation in it, as well as in making the social order of that activity visible. In this way, we argue, transitions provide another example of a site in which participants who are less and more experienced can ‘mutually apprentice’ one another to meaningful social interaction (Pontecorvo, Fasulo, & Sterponi, 2001). To put it differently, we posit that even though the more experienced participants, typically adults, frequently guide the less experienced participants, typically children, in carrying out an activity, transitions constitute jointly accomplished achievements that are shaped by the articipants' moment-to-moment contributions. The focus of our study is on the transitions that occur when families with young children are foraging in the woods, picking wild berries and mushrooms. The cases examined here predominantly concern transitions between what can generally be described as ‘searching’ and ‘picking’. Our main interest is in how the timing and length of each are adjusted in relation to local contingencies and how the adults work in different ways to maintain the children's engagement in the overall foraging activity.

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