Carlin2021

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Carlin2021
BibType ARTICLE
Key Carlin2021
Author(s) Andrew P. Carlin, Ricardo Moutinho
Title Teaching and learning moments as subjectively problematic: Foundational assumptions and methodological entailments
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Classroom interaction, ethnomethodology, foundationalism, perspicuous settings, teaching and learning moments, teaching practice
Publisher
Year 2021
Language English
City
Month
Journal Educational Philosophy and Theory
Volume 54
Number 11
Pages 48–60
URL Link
DOI 10.1080/00131857.2020.1848536
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This article takes a conceptual approach to an issue of pedagogical relevance—the presence of teaching and learning moments within educational environments. We suggest sources of philosophical confusions that design patterns for the classification and creation of typologies of classroom events. We identify three foundational assumptions with the way in which classroom events are analyzed: (1) Describing a classroom event (how it may be identified and described as a teaching and learning moment); (2) Devising a procedure for co-classifying events (introducing a typology distinguishing teaching and learning moments); (3) Repurposing decontextualized events to fit a preferred analytic model (distorting the phenomenology of events for the purpose of classifying these as teaching and learning moments). Hitherto these assumptions have obscured the phenomenal integrity of the learning environment; since the topic sought is based on critical incidents according to analysts’ interests, but not on the actual identifying details of the setting as made available by the participants. While teaching and learning moments are generic issues, in methodological terms these matters have to be explored in their details. In our article, we align ourselves with particular research approaches, namely ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, that facilitate close analysis of ‘perspicuous settings’, such as classroom interactions, through which phenomena such as teaching and learning moments are made visible as collaborative accomplishments.

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