Difference between revisions of "Ruehlemann-Gee2017"

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Ruehlemann-Gee2017
BibType ARTICLE
Key Ruehlemann-Gee2017
Author(s) Christoph Rühlemann, Matt Gee
Title Conversation Analysis and the XML method
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, XML, Quantification, XTranscript, XPath/XQuery
Publisher
Year 2017
Language English
City
Month
Journal Gesprächsforschung: Online-Zeitschrift zur verbalen Interaktion
Volume 18
Number
Pages 274-296
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this paper we introduce the XML method, a trio of technologies that can benefit conversation-analytic research. Specifically, we make a case for converting the cen- ter piece of CA research, the Jeffersonian transcript, into the format of the eXtensi- ble Mark-up Language (XML). XML essentially turns documents into hierarchi- cally ordered networks of nodes. As a network, an XML document can be exhaust- ively searched and any node or node set it contains can be extracted. We argue that the main benefit of formatting CA transcriptions in XML lies in the quantifiability that the format facilitates: CA-as-XML can provide precise "numbers and statistics" (Robinson 2007:65) thus helping to efficiently quantify observations and statisti- cally substantiate claims about the 'generalizability' of observed practices of social action. We also introduce XPath and XQuery, two related query languages designed to exploit the XML format. Further, we describe XTranscript, a free online tool developed to convert completed CA transcripts to XML. Central to our approach is that the methodology be accessible to linguistics of varying levels of technical ex- perience. Therefore, we also describe how this, and common concerns relating to the treatment of spoken data, have shaped our work in this area thus far.

Notes