Difference between revisions of "Rickard-etal2019"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Carolyn Rickard; Mara Strother; Barbara A. Fox; Chase Wesley Raymond |Title=Scaffolding Embodied Access for Categorization in Interactio...")
 
 
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|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|Author(s)=Carolyn Rickard; Mara Strother; Barbara A. Fox; Chase Wesley Raymond
 
|Author(s)=Carolyn Rickard; Mara Strother; Barbara A. Fox; Chase Wesley Raymond
|Title=Scaffolding Embodied Access for Categorization in Interactions between a Blind Child and Her Mother
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|Title=Scaffolding embodied access for categorization in interactions between a blind child and her mother
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Categorization; Acquisition; Embodiment; Multimodality; Blind; Childhood; Development
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Categorization; Acquisition; Embodiment; Multimodality; Blind; Childhood; Development
 
|Key=Rickard-etal2019
 
|Key=Rickard-etal2019
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|Volume=4
 
|Volume=4
 
|Number=1
 
|Number=1
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|Pages=Article 2
 
|URL=https://www.mdpi.com/2226-471X/4/1/2
 
|URL=https://www.mdpi.com/2226-471X/4/1/2
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4010002
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|DOI=10.3390/languages4010002
|Abstract=During language acquisition, sighted children have immediate and temporally stable access to the ‘gestalt’ of an object, including particular features that suggest its categorization as part of a class of objects. Blind children, however, must effectively and productively constitute the whole object from its constitutive parts in order to categorize them. While prior studies have suggested that varied experience and appropriate sensory access can contribute to this process, little attention has been given to how this is accomplished. The present study aims to address this issue by using conversation analysis to explore embodied understanding and categorization work between a 26-month-old congenitally blind child and her sighted mother as they play with various animal toys. Here we provide an analysis of a segment involving a particular toy (a cow plush), and ask two questions: (1) During play, how does Mother scaffold embodied routines for the identification of criterial information about a category, and (2) How is knowledge of varied exemplars, not directly accessible within the current activity, then made available to the child? Detailed examination of the linguistic and embodied practices employed by this mother–child dyad provides a concrete example of how non-visual modalities help scaffold the learning of categorization techniques, as well as illustrates the import that the examination of naturally occurring social interaction can have for theories of language and embodied cognition. View Full-Text
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|Abstract=During language acquisition, sighted children have immediate and temporally stable access to the ‘gestalt’ of an object, including particular features that suggest its categorization as part of a class of objects. Blind children, however, must effectively and productively constitute the whole object from its constitutive parts in order to categorize them. While prior studies have suggested that varied experience and appropriate sensory access can contribute to this process, little attention has been given to how this is accomplished. The present study aims to address this issue by using conversation analysis to explore embodied understanding and categorization work between a 26-month-old congenitally blind child and her sighted mother as they play with various animal toys. Here we provide an analysis of a segment involving a particular toy (a cow plush), and ask two questions: (1) During play, how does Mother scaffold embodied routines for the identification of criterial information about a category, and (2) How is knowledge of varied exemplars, not directly accessible within the current activity, then made available to the child? Detailed examination of the linguistic and embodied practices employed by this mother–child dyad provides a concrete example of how non-visual modalities help scaffold the learning of categorization techniques, as well as illustrates the import that the examination of naturally occurring social interaction can have for theories of language and embodied cognition.
 
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Latest revision as of 08:52, 16 January 2020

Rickard-etal2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Rickard-etal2019
Author(s) Carolyn Rickard, Mara Strother, Barbara A. Fox, Chase Wesley Raymond
Title Scaffolding embodied access for categorization in interactions between a blind child and her mother
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Categorization, Acquisition, Embodiment, Multimodality, Blind, Childhood, Development
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Languages
Volume 4
Number 1
Pages Article 2
URL Link
DOI 10.3390/languages4010002
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

During language acquisition, sighted children have immediate and temporally stable access to the ‘gestalt’ of an object, including particular features that suggest its categorization as part of a class of objects. Blind children, however, must effectively and productively constitute the whole object from its constitutive parts in order to categorize them. While prior studies have suggested that varied experience and appropriate sensory access can contribute to this process, little attention has been given to how this is accomplished. The present study aims to address this issue by using conversation analysis to explore embodied understanding and categorization work between a 26-month-old congenitally blind child and her sighted mother as they play with various animal toys. Here we provide an analysis of a segment involving a particular toy (a cow plush), and ask two questions: (1) During play, how does Mother scaffold embodied routines for the identification of criterial information about a category, and (2) How is knowledge of varied exemplars, not directly accessible within the current activity, then made available to the child? Detailed examination of the linguistic and embodied practices employed by this mother–child dyad provides a concrete example of how non-visual modalities help scaffold the learning of categorization techniques, as well as illustrates the import that the examination of naturally occurring social interaction can have for theories of language and embodied cognition.

Notes