Difference between revisions of "Rawls2019"

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|Author(s)=Anne Warfield Rawls;
 
|Author(s)=Anne Warfield Rawls;
|Title=Introduction to Garfinkel’s ‘Notes on Language Games’: Language events as cultural events
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|Title=Introduction to Garfinkel’s ‘Notes on Language Games’: Language events as cultural events in ‘systems of interaction’
in ‘systems of interaction’
 
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; constitutive rules; cultural anthropology; ethnomethodology; ethnoscience; games; Garfinkel; Parsons; philosophy of language; social theory; Wittgenstein
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; constitutive rules; cultural anthropology; ethnomethodology; ethnoscience; games; Garfinkel; Parsons; philosophy of language; social theory; Wittgenstein
 
|Key=Rawls2019
 
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|Pages=133–147
 
|Pages=133–147
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|URL=https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1368431018824698
 
|DOI=10.1177/1368431018824698
 
|DOI=10.1177/1368431018824698
|Abstract=This article discusses ‘Notes on Language Games’, written by Harold Garfinkel in 1960 and never before published, one of three distinct versions of his famous ‘Trust’ argument, i.e., that constitutive criteria define shared events, objects, and meanings.
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|Abstract=This article discusses ‘Notes on Language Games’, written by Harold Garfinkel in 1960 and never before published, one of three distinct versions of his famous ‘Trust’ argument, i.e., that constitutive criteria define shared events, objects, and meanings. The argument stands in contrast to an approach to cultural anthropology that was becoming popular in 1960 called ‘ethnoscience’. In this previously unknown manuscript, Garfinkel proposes that cultural events and language events are the same, in that both are created through constitutive commitments to interactional systems. The best-known version of the Trust argument (Garfinkel, 1963) emphasizes Schutz, while other versions build on Parsons (Garfinkel 2019). In this third version, the Trust conditions are elaborated in terms of Wittgenstein’s language games. Various strands of Garfinkel’s thinking about culture, language and interaction are interwoven. That Garfinkel was working with Parsons in 1960 to document a contractual basis for social events and their assembly practices in ‘systems of interaction’, a constitutive practice argument with roots in Durkheim’s work, is yet another strand. The article highlights how the Trust argument is the key to everything, not only ethnomethodology, but also Garfinkel’s attempt to develop a general sociology of culture, language and interaction.
The argument stands in contrast to an approach to cultural anthropology that was becoming popular in 1960 called ‘ethnoscience’. In this previously unknown manuscript, Garfinkel proposes that cultural events and language events are the same, in that both are created through constitutive commitments to interactional systems.
 
The best-known version of the Trust argument (Garfinkel, 1963) emphasizes Schutz, while other versions build on Parsons (Garfinkel 2019). In this third version, the Trust conditions are elaborated in terms of Wittgenstein’s language games. Various strands of Garfinkel’s thinking about culture, language and interaction are interwoven. That Garfinkel was working with Parsons in 1960 to document a contractual basis for social events and their assembly practices in ‘systems of interaction’, a constitutive practice argument with roots in Durkheim’s work, is yet another strand. The article highlights how the Trust argument is the key to everything, not only ethnomethodology, but also Garfinkel’s attempt to develop a general sociology of culture, language and interaction.
 
 
}}
 
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Latest revision as of 09:40, 16 January 2020

Rawls2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Rawls2019
Author(s) Anne Warfield Rawls
Title Introduction to Garfinkel’s ‘Notes on Language Games’: Language events as cultural events in ‘systems of interaction’
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, constitutive rules, cultural anthropology, ethnomethodology, ethnoscience, games, Garfinkel, Parsons, philosophy of language, social theory, Wittgenstein
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal European Journal of Social Theory
Volume 22
Number 2
Pages 133–147
URL Link
DOI 10.1177/1368431018824698
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This article discusses ‘Notes on Language Games’, written by Harold Garfinkel in 1960 and never before published, one of three distinct versions of his famous ‘Trust’ argument, i.e., that constitutive criteria define shared events, objects, and meanings. The argument stands in contrast to an approach to cultural anthropology that was becoming popular in 1960 called ‘ethnoscience’. In this previously unknown manuscript, Garfinkel proposes that cultural events and language events are the same, in that both are created through constitutive commitments to interactional systems. The best-known version of the Trust argument (Garfinkel, 1963) emphasizes Schutz, while other versions build on Parsons (Garfinkel 2019). In this third version, the Trust conditions are elaborated in terms of Wittgenstein’s language games. Various strands of Garfinkel’s thinking about culture, language and interaction are interwoven. That Garfinkel was working with Parsons in 1960 to document a contractual basis for social events and their assembly practices in ‘systems of interaction’, a constitutive practice argument with roots in Durkheim’s work, is yet another strand. The article highlights how the Trust argument is the key to everything, not only ethnomethodology, but also Garfinkel’s attempt to develop a general sociology of culture, language and interaction.

Notes