Persson2015a

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Persson2015a
BibType ARTICLE
Key Persson2015a
Author(s) Rasmus Persson
Title Indexing one’s own previous action as inadequate: On ah-prefaced repeats as receipt tokens in French talk-in-interaction
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Speech Prosody, Conversation Analysis, French language, French linguistics, Intersubjectivity, French, talk-in-interaction, repetition, receipts, particles, indexicality, intersubjectivity, prosody, phonetics
Publisher
Year 2015
Language English
City
Month
Journal Language in Society
Volume 44
Number
Pages 497– 524
URL
DOI 10.1017/S004740451500041X
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Indexing one ’ s own previous action as inadequate: On

ah

-prefaced repeats as receipt tokens in Frenchtalk-in-interaction This article considers a practice in French talk-in-interaction, formally char-acterized as other-repeats prefaced by the change-of-state particle ah. Thetarget practice accomplishes aclaim of receipt, while at the same time index-ing as somehow inadequate a previous turn by the receipt speaker. Evidencedrawn upon includes: (i) the sequential locations of the examined phenome-non; (ii) ensuing developments of the sequence, wherein the indexed inade-quacy is more explicitly acknowledged; and (iii) the discriminability of thefocal practice with respect to alternative practices. Two phonetically distin-guished variants of the practice, and their respective sequential projections(‘problematizing’ topicalization or ‘accepting’

closure), are discussed. Thisarticle contributes to the study of how intersubjectivity is managed and ad-ministered by participants, and to research on the management of account-ability for producing ‘adequate’ turns and actions. Finally, it addressesongoing discussions concerning the analysis of multiple actions (first- andsecond-order) conveyed simultaneously in single turns.

Notes