Difference between revisions of "Nielsen2019"

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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
|BibType=ARTICLE
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|BibType=INCOLLECTION
 
|Author(s)=Søren Beck Nielsen;
 
|Author(s)=Søren Beck Nielsen;
 
|Title=Dealing with Explicit Patient Demands for Antibiotics in a Clinical Setting
 
|Title=Dealing with Explicit Patient Demands for Antibiotics in a Clinical Setting
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|Tag(s)=EMCA; Resistance; Antibiotic prescribing; Medical EMCA
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Resistance; Antibiotic prescribing; Medical EMCA
 
|Key=Nielsen2019
 
|Key=Nielsen2019
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|Publisher=Palgrave Macmillan
 
|Year=2019
 
|Year=2019
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English

Revision as of 14:33, 22 November 2018

Nielsen2019
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Nielsen2019
Author(s) Søren Beck Nielsen
Title Dealing with Explicit Patient Demands for Antibiotics in a Clinical Setting
Editor(s) Carsten Strøby Jensen, Søren Beck Nielsen, Lars Fynbo
Tag(s) EMCA, Resistance, Antibiotic prescribing, Medical EMCA
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 25-40
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90656-0_2
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title Risking Antimicrobial Resistance
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This chapter is a conversation analytic single-case study of a video-recorded general practice consultation. This consultation represents a case where a patient, uninformed about appropriate use of antibiotics, puts a doctor under substantial pressure to prescribe penicillin by requesting it explicitly as the reason for his visit. Yet, the doctor exploits conversational structures in ways that enable her to turn the situation into one where the patient is properly diagnosed and explained the difference between viral and bacterial infections and the risks of unnecessary use of antibiotics. Thus, the study informs of how doctors can deal with demanding patients.

Notes