Difference between revisions of "Licoppe2018a"

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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
|Key=Licoppe2018a
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|BibType=ARTICLE
|Key=Licoppe2018a
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|Author(s)=Christian Licoppe; Julien Figeac;
 
|Title=Gaze Patterns and the Temporal Organization of Multiple Activities in Mobile Smartphone Uses
 
|Title=Gaze Patterns and the Temporal Organization of Multiple Activities in Mobile Smartphone Uses
|Author(s)=Christian Licoppe; Julien Figeac;
 
 
|Tag(s)=gaze; mobile phone
 
|Tag(s)=gaze; mobile phone
|BibType=ARTICLE
+
|Key=Licoppe2018a
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 +
|Language=English
 
|Month=sep
 
|Month=sep
 
|Journal=Human–Computer Interaction
 
|Journal=Human–Computer Interaction

Revision as of 14:36, 19 October 2018

Licoppe2018a
BibType ARTICLE
Key Licoppe2018a
Author(s) Christian Licoppe, Julien Figeac
Title Gaze Patterns and the Temporal Organization of Multiple Activities in Mobile Smartphone Uses
Editor(s)
Tag(s) gaze, mobile phone
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month sep
Journal Human–Computer Interaction
Volume 33
Number 5-6
Pages 311–334
URL Link
DOI 10.1080/07370024.2017.1326008
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

We have analyzed the temporal organization of gaze switches (to and away from the mobile screen) of mobile smartphone users in urban environments, and we discuss how such patterns of gaze switches can help us understand how users jointly manage mobile communication as well as other activities in everyday urban settings. More specifically, we report on the findings of an empirical study of smartphone use in transport situations, in which we have combined video recordings made with user-worn camera glasses with mobile screen capture data. First we show how being oriented toward multiactivity appears as a particular form of attunement to the potential sequential implicativeness of events occurring on screen or in the mobility environment. This provides the opportunity to treat them as possible occasions to switch the orientation of one's gaze from one activity-relevant field of activity to another. Second we discuss how interfaces with a “rugged” sequential texture. We argue that such rugged interfaces offer frequent sequential opportunities that might be especially useful in multiactivity situations in public places, where balancing the demands of two or more activities may constitute a serious moral and/or safety concern.

Notes