Difference between revisions of "Hutchby-OReilly2010"

From emcawiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Clair-AntoineVeyrier moved page Hutchby-O’Reilly2010 to Hutchby-OReilly2010: apostrophe in title seems to be source of trouble in bibliogrphy)
(key)
Line 4: Line 4:
 
|Title=Children’s participation and the familial moral order in  family therapy
 
|Title=Children’s participation and the familial moral order in  family therapy
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; child–adult interaction; children’s talk; conversation analysis; family; family therapy; moral order
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; child–adult interaction; children’s talk; conversation analysis; family; family therapy; moral order
|Key=Hutchby-O’Reilly2010
+
|Key=Hutchby-OReilly2010
 
|Year=2010
 
|Year=2010
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English

Revision as of 15:56, 7 September 2018

Hutchby-OReilly2010
BibType ARTICLE
Key Hutchby-OReilly2010
Author(s) Ian Hutchby, Michelle O’Reilly
Title Children’s participation and the familial moral order in family therapy
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, child–adult interaction, children’s talk, conversation analysis, family, family therapy, moral order
Publisher
Year 2010
Language English
City
Month
Journal Discourse Studies
Volume 12
Number 1
Pages 49–64
URL
DOI 10.1177/1461445609357406
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This article examines discourse practices surrounding children’s participation, non-participation, and the ‘moral order’ of the family in the setting of family therapy consultations. The analysis focuses on two central issues. First, the relationship between therapists’ questions, the speaker selection techniques built into those questions, and the responses produced by family members. Second, the relationship between turn-taking and the linguistic features of person deixis in disputes that emerge around children’s orientation to implicit accusations in the talk of other participants about them. The findings reveal how a familial ‘moral order’ is often at the root of how children’s competence as participants is managed by the parents, the therapist, and the children themselves.

Notes