Difference between revisions of "Hollander-Turowetz2013"

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|Author(s)=Matthew M. Hollander; Jason Turowetz
 
|Author(s)=Matthew M. Hollander; Jason Turowetz
 
|Title=“So, why did you decide to do this?” Soliciting and formulating motives for speed dating
 
|Title=“So, why did you decide to do this?” Soliciting and formulating motives for speed dating
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Accounts; conversation analysis; irony; motives; reported speech and thought; reports; speed  dating;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Accounts; conversation analysis; irony; motives; reported speech and thought; reports; speed  dating;
 
|Key=Hollander-Turowetz2013
 
|Key=Hollander-Turowetz2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
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|Number=6
 
|Number=6
 
|Pages=701–724
 
|Pages=701–724
|URL=http://das.sagepub.com/content/24/6/701
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|URL=https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0957926513503268
 
|DOI=10.1177/0957926513503268
 
|DOI=10.1177/0957926513503268
 
|Abstract=We bring a conversation analytic perspective to the phenomenon of soliciting and providing motives for participation in speed dating. Using data from three speed-dating events, we analyze how college-aged volunteers in a research study collaboratively formulate motives for participation and identities as speed daters. The findings reveal detailed and sequentially organized procedures by which participants display, monitor, and enforce normative expectations about how people of their age should treat this institutional activity. In particular, participants use a three-turn motive solicitation sequence to produce ‘casual’ accounts for participation that suggest a disinvested orientation toward speed dating. In the few cases in which what might be considered the ‘obvious’ motive for speed dating is invoked – meeting someone to date – it tends to be done ironically. When offered in earnest, however, interlocutors withhold alignment with this motive and treat it as accountable.
 
|Abstract=We bring a conversation analytic perspective to the phenomenon of soliciting and providing motives for participation in speed dating. Using data from three speed-dating events, we analyze how college-aged volunteers in a research study collaboratively formulate motives for participation and identities as speed daters. The findings reveal detailed and sequentially organized procedures by which participants display, monitor, and enforce normative expectations about how people of their age should treat this institutional activity. In particular, participants use a three-turn motive solicitation sequence to produce ‘casual’ accounts for participation that suggest a disinvested orientation toward speed dating. In the few cases in which what might be considered the ‘obvious’ motive for speed dating is invoked – meeting someone to date – it tends to be done ironically. When offered in earnest, however, interlocutors withhold alignment with this motive and treat it as accountable.
 
}}
 
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Latest revision as of 14:15, 4 December 2019

Hollander-Turowetz2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Hollander-Turowetz2013
Author(s) Matthew M. Hollander, Jason Turowetz
Title “So, why did you decide to do this?” Soliciting and formulating motives for speed dating
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Accounts, conversation analysis, irony, motives, reported speech and thought, reports, speed dating
Publisher
Year 2013
Language
City
Month
Journal Discourse & Society
Volume 24
Number 6
Pages 701–724
URL Link
DOI 10.1177/0957926513503268
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

We bring a conversation analytic perspective to the phenomenon of soliciting and providing motives for participation in speed dating. Using data from three speed-dating events, we analyze how college-aged volunteers in a research study collaboratively formulate motives for participation and identities as speed daters. The findings reveal detailed and sequentially organized procedures by which participants display, monitor, and enforce normative expectations about how people of their age should treat this institutional activity. In particular, participants use a three-turn motive solicitation sequence to produce ‘casual’ accounts for participation that suggest a disinvested orientation toward speed dating. In the few cases in which what might be considered the ‘obvious’ motive for speed dating is invoked – meeting someone to date – it tends to be done ironically. When offered in earnest, however, interlocutors withhold alignment with this motive and treat it as accountable.

Notes