Difference between revisions of "Hauser2013"

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|Title=Stability and change in one adult's second language English negation
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; second language acquisition; formulaic speech; L2 English; L2 negation; longitudinal research;
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; second language acquisition; formulaic speech; L2 English; L2 negation; longitudinal research;
 
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Latest revision as of 14:24, 4 December 2019

Hauser2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Hauser2013
Author(s) Eric Hauser
Title Stability and change in one adult's second language English negation
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, second language acquisition, formulaic speech, L2 English, L2 negation, longitudinal research
Publisher
Year 2013
Language
City
Month
Journal Language Learning
Volume 63
Number 3
Pages 463–498
URL Link
DOI 10.1111/lang.12012
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This article reports on how, against a background of relatively stable patterns of second language negation, a Japanese-speaking adult learning English made use of a negative formula, “I don't know,” and how, in and through interaction, analyzed it into its component parts and began using “don't” more productively. Making use of the micro-analytic techniques of conversation analysis to analyze data collected over a seven-month period, two relatively stable patterns of negation are described. This is followed by a description of how the learner used the formula and, over time, analyzed it. This often involved repetition and/or self-repair. Changes in how “don't” was used included coming to use it with the verb “like,” as well as coming to use it with “you.”

Notes