Difference between revisions of "Greer2013"

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|Author(s)=Tim Greer
 
|Author(s)=Tim Greer
 
|Title=Establishing a pattern of dual receptive language alternation: Insights from a series of successive haircuts
 
|Title=Establishing a pattern of dual receptive language alternation: Insights from a series of successive haircuts
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Bilingual;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Bilingual;
 
|Key=Greer2013
 
|Key=Greer2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
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|Number=2
 
|Number=2
 
|Pages=47–61
 
|Pages=47–61
|URL=http://austjourcomm.org/index.php/ajc/article/view/1/28
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|URL=https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=823784847845495;res=IELAPA
 
|Abstract=This study uses longitudinal Conversation Analysis to track bilingual interaction between a Japanese hairdresser and his Bolivian client. By the end of the first appointment they had enacted an unstated policy of dual-receptive language alternation in which the hairdresser primarily spoke Japanese and the client used English as a lingua franca. In the later sessions the participants mixed other-medium lexical items within their turns in ways that were less marked, adapting the way they formulated their turns by simplifying and modifying them according to the notions of recipient design that they held about each other. The analysis also highlights two of the interactional practices that helped establish this pattern of language use.
 
|Abstract=This study uses longitudinal Conversation Analysis to track bilingual interaction between a Japanese hairdresser and his Bolivian client. By the end of the first appointment they had enacted an unstated policy of dual-receptive language alternation in which the hairdresser primarily spoke Japanese and the client used English as a lingua franca. In the later sessions the participants mixed other-medium lexical items within their turns in ways that were less marked, adapting the way they formulated their turns by simplifying and modifying them according to the notions of recipient design that they held about each other. The analysis also highlights two of the interactional practices that helped establish this pattern of language use.
 
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Latest revision as of 14:29, 4 December 2019

Greer2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Greer2013
Author(s) Tim Greer
Title Establishing a pattern of dual receptive language alternation: Insights from a series of successive haircuts
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Bilingual
Publisher
Year 2013
Language
City
Month
Journal Australian Journal of Communication
Volume 40
Number 2
Pages 47–61
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This study uses longitudinal Conversation Analysis to track bilingual interaction between a Japanese hairdresser and his Bolivian client. By the end of the first appointment they had enacted an unstated policy of dual-receptive language alternation in which the hairdresser primarily spoke Japanese and the client used English as a lingua franca. In the later sessions the participants mixed other-medium lexical items within their turns in ways that were less marked, adapting the way they formulated their turns by simplifying and modifying them according to the notions of recipient design that they held about each other. The analysis also highlights two of the interactional practices that helped establish this pattern of language use.

Notes