Difference between revisions of "Ekberg-etal2020b"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Katie Ekberg; Lara Weinglass; Stuart Ekberg; Susan Danby; Anthony Herbert |Title=The pervasive relevance of COVID-19 within routine paed...")
 
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|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=Palliative Medicine
 
|Journal=Palliative Medicine
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|URL=https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32799739/
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|DOI=10.1177/0269216320950089
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|Abstract=Background: The importance of caring for children with complex and serious conditions means that paediatric palliative care must continue during pandemics. The recent pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) provides a natural experiment to study health communication during pandemic times. However, it is unknown how communication within consultations might change during pandemics.
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Aim: This study, a sub-study of a larger project, aimed to examine real-world instances of communication in paediatric palliative care consultations prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic to understand how clinicians and families talk about the pandemic.
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Design: Paediatric palliative care consultations prior to, during, and immediately following the initial peak of COVID-19 cases in Australia were video recorded and analysed using Conversation Analysis methods.
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Setting/participants: Twenty-five paediatric palliative care consultations (including face-to-face outpatient, telehealth outpatient and inpatient consultations) were video recorded within a public children's hospital in Australia. Participants included 14 health professionals, 15 child patients, 23 adult family members and 5 child siblings.
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Results: There was a pervasive relevance of both serious and non-serious talk about COVID-19 within the consultations recorded during the pandemic. Topics typical of a standard paediatric palliative care consultation often led to discussion of the pandemic. Clinicians (55%) and parents (45%) initiated talk about the pandemic.
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Conclusions: Clinicians should not be surprised by the pervasiveness of COVID-19 or other pandemic talk within standard paediatric palliative care consultations. This awareness will enable clinicians to flexibly address family needs and concerns about pandemic-related matters that may impact health and wellbeing.
 
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Revision as of 15:43, 4 September 2020

Ekberg-etal2020b
BibType ARTICLE
Key Ekberg-etal2020b
Author(s) Katie Ekberg, Lara Weinglass, Stuart Ekberg, Susan Danby, Anthony Herbert
Title The pervasive relevance of COVID-19 within routine paediatric palliative care consultations during the pandemic: A conversation analytic study
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, COVID-19, Palliative care, Children, Pandemic, In press
Publisher
Year 2020
Language English
City
Month
Journal Palliative Medicine
Volume
Number
Pages
URL Link
DOI 10.1177/0269216320950089
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Background: The importance of caring for children with complex and serious conditions means that paediatric palliative care must continue during pandemics. The recent pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) provides a natural experiment to study health communication during pandemic times. However, it is unknown how communication within consultations might change during pandemics.

Aim: This study, a sub-study of a larger project, aimed to examine real-world instances of communication in paediatric palliative care consultations prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic to understand how clinicians and families talk about the pandemic.

Design: Paediatric palliative care consultations prior to, during, and immediately following the initial peak of COVID-19 cases in Australia were video recorded and analysed using Conversation Analysis methods.

Setting/participants: Twenty-five paediatric palliative care consultations (including face-to-face outpatient, telehealth outpatient and inpatient consultations) were video recorded within a public children's hospital in Australia. Participants included 14 health professionals, 15 child patients, 23 adult family members and 5 child siblings.

Results: There was a pervasive relevance of both serious and non-serious talk about COVID-19 within the consultations recorded during the pandemic. Topics typical of a standard paediatric palliative care consultation often led to discussion of the pandemic. Clinicians (55%) and parents (45%) initiated talk about the pandemic.

Conclusions: Clinicians should not be surprised by the pervasiveness of COVID-19 or other pandemic talk within standard paediatric palliative care consultations. This awareness will enable clinicians to flexibly address family needs and concerns about pandemic-related matters that may impact health and wellbeing.

Notes