DeAlmeida2020

From emcawiki
Revision as of 15:18, 4 September 2020 by ElliottHoey (talk | contribs) (Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Fabio Ferraz de Almeida; Paul Drew |Title=The fabric of law-in-action: ‘formulating’ the suspect’s account during police intervie...")
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
DeAlmeida2020
BibType ARTICLE
Key DeAlmeida2020
Author(s) Fabio Ferraz de Almeida, Paul Drew
Title The fabric of law-in-action: ‘formulating’ the

suspect’s account during police interviews in England

Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Police, Interview, Formulation, Questioning, Law, Law in action
Publisher
Year 2020
Language English
City
Month
Journal The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law
Volume 27
Number 1
Pages 35-58
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1558/ijsll.38527
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This article reports findings from a study of police interviews of people suspected of having committed relatively minor criminal offences, in a police station in England. The data comprise audio-recorded investigative interviews which were analysed using conversation analysis. It is focused on a communicative practice employed by police officers while questioning suspects. This practice is to ‘formulate’ what the suspect has just said; formulations are a means of summarising the suspect’s evidence in a particular phase of questioning, in such a way as to represent the suspect’s own words. Formulations, as a practice in talk-in-interaction, enable police officers to a) summarise the upshot of what a suspect has said during a period or phase of questioning, b) attribute this summary directly to a suspect’s ‘own words’, c) construct a suspect’s account (confirmation) as legally relevant, and which can d) elicit from the suspect a form of admission. Formulations are employed as a mechanism to rework prior descriptions and utterances by transforming and elaborating them and consolidating their legal relevance. Through this practice, police officers manage to attribute legal labels to what suspects have said during the interview, to their evidence (e.g. as denying, admitting, telling, etc.) as well as to the character of the incidents or events in question (e.g. assault, breach of harassment warning, criminal damage, arson). Formulating, therefore, is an interactional practice through which key legal work is accomplished in police interviews with suspects in England. It is a device that constitutes the fabric of law-in-action.

Notes