Difference between revisions of "Cook1990"

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|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|Author(s)=Guy Cook
 
|Author(s)=Guy Cook
|Title=Transcribing infinity: Problems of contextpresentation
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|Title=Transcribing infinity: Problems of context presentation
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Transcription; Context
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Transcription; Context
 
|Key=Cook1990
 
|Key=Cook1990
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|Volume=14
 
|Volume=14
 
|Pages=1-24
 
|Pages=1-24
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|URL=https://doi.org/10.1016/0378-2166(90)90061-H
 +
|DOI=10.1016/0378-2166(90)90061-H
 
|Abstract=This  paper  attempts  to  classify  context  types  relevant  to  discourse  pragmatics,  and  examines  the theoretical  and  practical  problems  inherent  in attempts  to  transcribe  them.  It  argues  that:  (I)  the quantity  of  context  relevant  to  discourse  pragmatics,  being  infinite  in  the  two  senses  that  it  is infinitely  delicate  and  infinitely  expandable,  is not  capable  of  transcription;  (a)  transcription  can become  more  delicate  or  more  expansive,  but  as  it  does  so  it  diminishes  the  amount  of  co-text  it can  represent,  and  there  is  thus  a  theoretical  as well  as  practical  limit  to  the  amount  of  relevant detail  that  can  be  transcribed;  (3)  discourse  pragmatics  must  distinguish  context  in  the  fictional examples  of  pragmatic  philosophers  and  context  in  actual  discourse,  and  abandon  the  claim  to completeness  and  objectivity  inherent  in  scientfic  style  transcription  systems.
 
|Abstract=This  paper  attempts  to  classify  context  types  relevant  to  discourse  pragmatics,  and  examines  the theoretical  and  practical  problems  inherent  in attempts  to  transcribe  them.  It  argues  that:  (I)  the quantity  of  context  relevant  to  discourse  pragmatics,  being  infinite  in  the  two  senses  that  it  is infinitely  delicate  and  infinitely  expandable,  is not  capable  of  transcription;  (a)  transcription  can become  more  delicate  or  more  expansive,  but  as  it  does  so  it  diminishes  the  amount  of  co-text  it can  represent,  and  there  is  thus  a  theoretical  as well  as  practical  limit  to  the  amount  of  relevant detail  that  can  be  transcribed;  (3)  discourse  pragmatics  must  distinguish  context  in  the  fictional examples  of  pragmatic  philosophers  and  context  in  actual  discourse,  and  abandon  the  claim  to completeness  and  objectivity  inherent  in  scientfic  style  transcription  systems.
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 16:13, 13 August 2018

Cook1990
BibType ARTICLE
Key Cook1990
Author(s) Guy Cook
Title Transcribing infinity: Problems of context presentation
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Transcription, Context
Publisher
Year 1990
Language English
City
Month
Journal Journal of Pragmatics
Volume 14
Number
Pages 1-24
URL Link
DOI 10.1016/0378-2166(90)90061-H
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This paper attempts to classify context types relevant to discourse pragmatics, and examines the theoretical and practical problems inherent in attempts to transcribe them. It argues that: (I) the quantity of context relevant to discourse pragmatics, being infinite in the two senses that it is infinitely delicate and infinitely expandable, is not capable of transcription; (a) transcription can become more delicate or more expansive, but as it does so it diminishes the amount of co-text it can represent, and there is thus a theoretical as well as practical limit to the amount of relevant detail that can be transcribed; (3) discourse pragmatics must distinguish context in the fictional examples of pragmatic philosophers and context in actual discourse, and abandon the claim to completeness and objectivity inherent in scientfic style transcription systems.

Notes