Difference between revisions of "Barske2006"

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|Title=CO-CONSTRUCTING SOCIAL ROLES IN GERMAN BUSINESS MEETINGS: A CONVERSATION ANALYTIC STUDY
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|Title=Co-constructing Social Roles In German Business Meetings: A Conversation Analytic Study
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Business meeting; German
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Business meeting; German
 
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|Key=Barske2006

Latest revision as of 11:50, 13 April 2020

Barske2006
BibType PHDTHESIS
Key Barske2006
Author(s) Tobias Barske
Title Co-constructing Social Roles In German Business Meetings: A Conversation Analytic Study
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Business meeting, German
Publisher
Year 2006
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In Chapter 1, I situate this dissertation within existing studies on business meetings and introduce the research methodology of conversation analysis. Chapter 2 examines all uses of the particle ok in German business meetings. In my presentation of the first description of ok in a language other than English, I argue that certain uses of ok relate to enacting the social role of ‘doing-being-boss.’ Furthermore, Chapter 3 examines the practice of how employees produce extended reports about ongoing projects. In discussing the social role of ‘doing-being-employee,’ I compare the practice of story-telling in ordinary conversation to that of producing reports during German business meetings. Specifically, I describe how speakers orient to a systematic use of intonation patterns to enable correct and complete reports. Moreover, Chapter 4 problematizes the notion of pre-assigned social roles. Using the concept of zones of interactional transition, I discuss instances where employees question the role of meeting facilitator, chairperson, and boss. In analyzing the interactional fallout in these examples, I offer additional evidence that social roles such as boss represent a social construct which depends on a constant co-construction of this role. Finally, in the conclusion I situate my findings within the field of institutional talk.

Notes