Difference between revisions of "Auer-Hoermeyer2015"

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|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|Author(s)=Peter Auer; Ina Hörmeyer;
 
|Author(s)=Peter Auer; Ina Hörmeyer;
|Title=Achieving intersubjectivity in Augmented and Alternative Communication (AAC): Intercorporeal, embodied and disembodied practices  
+
|Title=Achieving intersubjectivity in Augmented and Alternative Communication (AAC): Intercorporeal, embodied and disembodied practices
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; IL;  Augmented Alternative Communication; intersubjectivity; intercorporeality; embodiment; multimodal conversation analysis;
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; IL;  Augmented Alternative Communication; intersubjectivity; intercorporeality; embodiment; multimodal conversation analysis;
|Key=Auer-Hoermeyer 2015
+
|Key=Auer-Hoermeyer2015
 
|Year=2015
 
|Year=2015
 +
|Language=English
 
|Journal=InLiSt - Interaction and Linguistic Structures
 
|Journal=InLiSt - Interaction and Linguistic Structures
 
|Volume=55
 
|Volume=55
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|Abstract=In  this  paper we  investigate  communication which  includes  the  use  of  computer-
 
|Abstract=In  this  paper we  investigate  communication which  includes  the  use  of  computer-
 
based speech aids by people with severe cerebral palsy (Augmented and Alternative Communication, AAC). The  reduced  bodily  capacities  and  the  'uncontrolled  bodies'  of  the  participants suffering from CP make bodily synchronization with their partners a considerable challenge. What  is more,  the  electronic  speech  aid  not  only  produces  a  disembodied  language (synthetic speech), but also has a massive  impact on  the mutual corporeal attunement of  the participants. It slows down the production of turns to such a degree that sequential structure – and hence also mutual understanding – are  in danger of being destroyed, and  it brings about the Augmented/Alternative  Communicator's  withdrawal  from  the  ongoing  focused  interaction. It will be shown that these detrimental effects of AAC can lead to a breakdown in temporal, sequential and  topical structure, and  to  interactional failure and  lack of understanding.  
 
based speech aids by people with severe cerebral palsy (Augmented and Alternative Communication, AAC). The  reduced  bodily  capacities  and  the  'uncontrolled  bodies'  of  the  participants suffering from CP make bodily synchronization with their partners a considerable challenge. What  is more,  the  electronic  speech  aid  not  only  produces  a  disembodied  language (synthetic speech), but also has a massive  impact on  the mutual corporeal attunement of  the participants. It slows down the production of turns to such a degree that sequential structure – and hence also mutual understanding – are  in danger of being destroyed, and  it brings about the Augmented/Alternative  Communicator's  withdrawal  from  the  ongoing  focused  interaction. It will be shown that these detrimental effects of AAC can lead to a breakdown in temporal, sequential and  topical structure, and  to  interactional failure and  lack of understanding.  
However, we will  also  be  shown  that  there  are ways  to  overcome  these  risks. On  the  one hand, the negative impact of the 'talking machine' can be minimized when the user reduces the time  needed  to  output  speech  by  refraining  from  putting  together  complex  utterances;  this strategy  requires  co-participants'  willingness  and  competence  to  integrate  the  machine-produced semantic hint into a sequence of 'post-processing'. Another way of meeting the challenges  and  risks  of  a  'talking  machine'  is  a  'moderator'  who  channels  and  controls  coparticipants'  activities despite  the Augmented/Alternative Communicator's  focus on  the machine, even during  the production of a complex utterance. In both ways,  the machine can be 'embodied', and the interaction can – despite CP – become an 'intercorporeal' one.  
+
However, we will  also  be  shown  that  there  are ways  to  overcome  these  risks. On  the  one hand, the negative impact of the 'talking machine' can be minimized when the user reduces the time  needed  to  output  speech  by  refraining  from  putting  together  complex  utterances;  this strategy  requires  co-participants'  willingness  and  competence  to  integrate  the  machine-produced semantic hint into a sequence of 'post-processing'. Another way of meeting the challenges  and  risks  of  a  'talking  machine'  is  a  'moderator'  who  channels  and  controls  coparticipants'  activities despite  the Augmented/Alternative Communicator's  focus on  the machine, even during  the production of a complex utterance. In both ways,  the machine can be 'embodied', and the interaction can – despite CP – become an 'intercorporeal' one.
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 14:45, 11 July 2018

Auer-Hoermeyer2015
BibType ARTICLE
Key Auer-Hoermeyer2015
Author(s) Peter Auer, Ina Hörmeyer
Title Achieving intersubjectivity in Augmented and Alternative Communication (AAC): Intercorporeal, embodied and disembodied practices
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, IL, Augmented Alternative Communication, intersubjectivity, intercorporeality, embodiment, multimodal conversation analysis
Publisher
Year 2015
Language English
City
Month
Journal InLiSt - Interaction and Linguistic Structures
Volume 55
Number
Pages
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this paper we investigate communication which includes the use of computer- based speech aids by people with severe cerebral palsy (Augmented and Alternative Communication, AAC). The reduced bodily capacities and the 'uncontrolled bodies' of the participants suffering from CP make bodily synchronization with their partners a considerable challenge. What is more, the electronic speech aid not only produces a disembodied language (synthetic speech), but also has a massive impact on the mutual corporeal attunement of the participants. It slows down the production of turns to such a degree that sequential structure – and hence also mutual understanding – are in danger of being destroyed, and it brings about the Augmented/Alternative Communicator's withdrawal from the ongoing focused interaction. It will be shown that these detrimental effects of AAC can lead to a breakdown in temporal, sequential and topical structure, and to interactional failure and lack of understanding. However, we will also be shown that there are ways to overcome these risks. On the one hand, the negative impact of the 'talking machine' can be minimized when the user reduces the time needed to output speech by refraining from putting together complex utterances; this strategy requires co-participants' willingness and competence to integrate the machine-produced semantic hint into a sequence of 'post-processing'. Another way of meeting the challenges and risks of a 'talking machine' is a 'moderator' who channels and controls coparticipants' activities despite the Augmented/Alternative Communicator's focus on the machine, even during the production of a complex utterance. In both ways, the machine can be 'embodied', and the interaction can – despite CP – become an 'intercorporeal' one.

Notes