Difference between revisions of "Akers-Porrini1997a"

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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
|Key=Akers-Porrini1997a
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|BibType=ARTICLE
|Key=Akers-Porrini1997a
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|Author(s)=Ruth Akers-Porrini;
 
|Title=The telephone visit. 'Hold on, Gramps!'
 
|Title=The telephone visit. 'Hold on, Gramps!'
|Author(s)=Ruth Akers-Porrini;
 
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; telephone; visit
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; telephone; visit
|BibType=ARTICLE
+
|Key=Akers-Porrini1997a
 
|Year=1997
 
|Year=1997
 +
|Language=French
 
|Journal=Réseaux. The French journal of communication
 
|Journal=Réseaux. The French journal of communication
 
|Volume=5
 
|Volume=5

Revision as of 16:15, 26 September 2018

Akers-Porrini1997a
BibType ARTICLE
Key Akers-Porrini1997a
Author(s) Ruth Akers-Porrini
Title The telephone visit. 'Hold on, Gramps!'
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, telephone, visit
Publisher
Year 1997
Language French
City
Month
Journal Réseaux. The French journal of communication
Volume 5
Number 2
Pages 241–269
URL Link
DOI 10.3406/reso.1997.3331
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

An essential aspect of telephone use by the general public is its role at key moments in family life: marriage, divorce or separation, birth, childhood events, illness and death. Usually an event is announced by telephone; a letter or a telegram is considered less appropriate, at least for the more immediate family members. While any telephone conversation enables interlocutors to maintain their relationships, the announcement by phone of an event relevant to the family emphasises them. One telephones to announce an event, to inquire about another's well-being, to reassure a family member, to provide support and to be, in a sense, present.

Notes