Wagner2019

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Wagner2019
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Wagner2019
Author(s) Johannes Wagner
Title Towards an Epistemology of Second Language Learning in the Wild
Editor(s) Søren W. Eskildsen, Simona Pekarek Doehler, Arja Piirainen-Marsh, John Hellermann
Tag(s) EMCA, Collection, Documentary method, Ecological validity, Embodiment, Language teaching epistemology, Social infrastructure
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 251-271
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-22165-2_10
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title Conversation Analytic Research on Learning-in-Action
Chapter

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Abstract

This chapter argues that a new epistemology for the field of SLA, rooted in sociology rather than in psychology, is taking form with radical consequences for the organization of second language practices, including learning and teaching. Central elements in this new epistemology are the following elements to be discussed in the chapter: 1. Learning is bound to participation in the life world and therefore to the personal history of each learner.


2. Spoken language is the primordial mode of mundane social interaction.


3. Classrooms need to feed on the everyday practices of the students and to center on support students to establish life world relations.


4. In the social interactions in which language learners engage, trouble in the talk will often trigger repair practices through which new language material is offered by the co-participants.


The chapter outlines the argument and methodology that lie behind this new epistemology, drawing on Ethnomethodology (EM) and Conversation Analysis (CA), thereby reformulating second language learning as an embodied, sociological project. Finally, the chapter discusses the consequences of this sociological perspective on learning for conceptualizing second language teaching in the form of the development of resources for creating social infrastructures for learning.

Notes