Difference between revisions of "VomLehn2017"

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VomLehn2017
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key VomLehn2017
Author(s) Dirk vom Lehn
Title Harold Garfinkel
Editor(s) Michael Hviid Jacobsen
Tag(s) EMCA, history, theory, Garfinkel
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan UK
Year 2017
Language
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 233–261
URL Link
DOI 10.1057/978-1-137-58184-6_9
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title The Interactionist Imagination: Studying Meaning, Situation and Micro-Social Order
Chapter

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Abstract

This chapter is concerned with Harold Garfinkel (1917–2011), the founder of ethnomethodology. When Garfinkel began the development of ethnomethodology in the 1940s the foundations for interactionist sociology had already been laid by the American pragmatists and the Chicago School of Sociology. At the time, he studied for a PhD with Talcott Parsons at Harvard and regularly met with Alfred Schutz who had written on phenomenology and its relevance to understand the everyday. Garfinkel used his knowledge of Parsons and Schutz to develop, what he called then, a ‘sociological attitude’. This sociological attitude involved a critique of existing sociological theory and approaches to sociological research as they created description of the social world that had nothing in common with the social world as experienced by the actors themselves. In this chapter, I will discuss Garfinkel’s critique of contemporary sociology, and in particular I will explore how he resolved the problem of ‘social order’ whilst at the same time radicalizing the notion of ‘situatedness’ as a fundamental property of meaning and situations. The chapter will begin with an embedding of the emergence of ethnomethodology in Garfinkel’s academic biography. It then will discuss how the notion of ‘indexicality’ has influenced the development of ethnomethodology and related approaches. The chapter will be brought to a close with a discussion about the importance of Garfinkel and ethnomethodology for the further development of interactionist sociology.

Notes