Difference between revisions of "VomLehn-etal2013"

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VomLehn-etal2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key VomLehn-etal2013
Author(s) Dirk vom Lehn, Helena Webb, Christian Heath, Will Gibson
Title Assessing Distance Vision as Interactional Achievement: A Study of Commensuration in Action
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Optometrie consultation, Testing
Publisher
Year 2013
Language English
City
Month
Journal Soziale Welt
Volume 64
Number 1-2
Pages 115-136
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
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Abstract

The paper explores the organization of the Distance Vision Test as a process through

which optometrists derive an objective test score from subjective assessments of their clients' quality  of reading out lines of letters. The analysis of video-recorded Optometrie consultations explores how  the standard letter-chart features in the interaction between optometrist and client. It examines specific fragments of test procedures to reveal how aspects of the chart are used by optometrist and  client to practically organize the test and to determine the quality of clients' distance vision. The paper argues that the objective definition of the test result requires that optometrists carefully introduce clients to the test procedure to avoid the reading quality and the test result being influenced by influences such as anxiety. Only after this introduction to the test, clients are encouraged to read a line of letters that follows a larger line they had difficulty to read out from the chart. The quality
of the reading out of this line then is transformed into the visual acuity score. This process of transforming incommensurable qualities, reading out and seeing, into quantities in order to make them comparable, is called commensuration.

Notes