Difference between revisions of "VandeWeerd2019"

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|Author(s)=Pomme van de Weerd
 
|Author(s)=Pomme van de Weerd
 
|Title=“Those foreigners ruin everything here”: Interactional functions of ethnic labelling among pupils in the Netherlands
 
|Title=“Those foreigners ruin everything here”: Interactional functions of ethnic labelling among pupils in the Netherlands
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Netherlands; MCA; Membership categorization analysis; Identity; Ethnicity; Race
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Netherlands; MCA; Membership categorization analysis; Identity; Ethnicity; Race; Racism
 
|Key=VandeWeerd2019
 
|Key=VandeWeerd2019
 
|Year=2019
 
|Year=2019

Latest revision as of 14:47, 11 June 2020

VandeWeerd2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key VandeWeerd2019
Author(s) Pomme van de Weerd
Title “Those foreigners ruin everything here”: Interactional functions of ethnic labelling among pupils in the Netherlands
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Netherlands, MCA, Membership categorization analysis, Identity, Ethnicity, Race, Racism
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Journal of Sociolinguistics
Volume 23
Number 3
Pages 244-262
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/josl.12344
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This paper contributes to a deeper understanding of ethnic labelling practices by examining their interactional functions among secondary school pupils in Venlo, the Netherlands. Pupils with migration backgrounds often labelled themselves and others “Turk,” “Moroccan,” or “foreigner,” and labelled others “Dutch.” The paper highlights that ethnic labelling can be understood not only as identity construction, but also as interactional work. I build on membership categorization analysis (MCA), complemented by conversation analysis (CA), to analyse how pupils’ use of ethnic labels evoked an expert role which altered interactants’ power positions; and how, often, pupils engaged in jocular mockery with ethnic labels and in that way mitigated the effects of exclusionary and stigmatizing discourses about people with migration backgrounds. Finally, I argue that pupils’ labelling practices had locally occasioned meanings and functions, but that they ultimately reflect wider‐spread systems of categorization and marginalization of people with migration backgrounds in the Netherlands.

Notes