Difference between revisions of "Stockbridge-Wooffitt2019"

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|Pages=437–454
|URL=https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794118773238
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|URL=https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1468794118773238
 
|DOI=10.1177/1468794118773238
 
|DOI=10.1177/1468794118773238
 
|Abstract=In this article we develop an approach to coincidences as discursive activities. To illustrate the range of empirical questions that can be explored in the analysis of coincidence accounts, we examine one single written account, which was submitted to a website of a research project to investigate the statistical dimensions of coincidence experiences. Our analysis is broadly ethnomethodological in that we examine this single case to identify how structural and narrative components work to constitute the recognizably coincidental quality of the events so described. The analysis identifies a mirror structure that resembles chiasmus, a figurative device found in classical texts. The analysis also describes how the account is designed to address inferential matters related to the site to which it was submitted. In the discussion we reflect on the implications of this approach for other approaches to coincidence.
 
|Abstract=In this article we develop an approach to coincidences as discursive activities. To illustrate the range of empirical questions that can be explored in the analysis of coincidence accounts, we examine one single written account, which was submitted to a website of a research project to investigate the statistical dimensions of coincidence experiences. Our analysis is broadly ethnomethodological in that we examine this single case to identify how structural and narrative components work to constitute the recognizably coincidental quality of the events so described. The analysis identifies a mirror structure that resembles chiasmus, a figurative device found in classical texts. The analysis also describes how the account is designed to address inferential matters related to the site to which it was submitted. In the discussion we reflect on the implications of this approach for other approaches to coincidence.
 
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Latest revision as of 08:29, 16 January 2020

Stockbridge-Wooffitt2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Stockbridge-Wooffitt2019
Author(s) Germaine Stockbridge, Robin Wooffitt
Title Coincidence by design
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, accounts, coincidence, discourse, ethnomethodology, psychotherapy, relational psychoanalysis, synchronicity
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Qualitative Research
Volume 19
Number 4
Pages 437–454
URL Link
DOI 10.1177/1468794118773238
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this article we develop an approach to coincidences as discursive activities. To illustrate the range of empirical questions that can be explored in the analysis of coincidence accounts, we examine one single written account, which was submitted to a website of a research project to investigate the statistical dimensions of coincidence experiences. Our analysis is broadly ethnomethodological in that we examine this single case to identify how structural and narrative components work to constitute the recognizably coincidental quality of the events so described. The analysis identifies a mirror structure that resembles chiasmus, a figurative device found in classical texts. The analysis also describes how the account is designed to address inferential matters related to the site to which it was submitted. In the discussion we reflect on the implications of this approach for other approaches to coincidence.

Notes