Difference between revisions of "Smart-etal2019a"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=INCOLLECTION |Author(s)=Cordet Smart; Christianne Pollock; Lindsay Aikman; Erica Willoughby |Title=Power Struggles in MDT Meetings: Using Different Orders...")
 
 
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|BibType=INCOLLECTION
 
|BibType=INCOLLECTION
 
|Author(s)=Cordet Smart; Christianne Pollock; Lindsay Aikman; Erica Willoughby
 
|Author(s)=Cordet Smart; Christianne Pollock; Lindsay Aikman; Erica Willoughby
|Title=Power Struggles in MDT Meetings: Using Different Orders of Interaction to Understand the Interplay of Hierarchy, Knowledge and Accountability
+
|Title=Power struggles in MDT meetings: using different orders of interaction to understand the interplay of hierarchy, knowledge and accountability
|Editor(s)=C. Smart; T. Auburn;
+
|Editor(s)=Cordet Smart; Timothy Auburn;
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Power; Hierarchy; Deontics; Epistemics; Professional Meetings
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Power; Hierarchy; Deontics; Epistemics; Professional Meetings
 
|Key=Smart-etal2019a
 
|Key=Smart-etal2019a
 +
|Publisher=Palgrave Macmillan
 
|Year=2019
 
|Year=2019
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
|Booktitle=Interprofessional Care and Mental Health. The Language of Mental Health
+
|Address=Cham
|Pages=97-121
+
|Booktitle=Interprofessional Care and Mental Health: The Language of Mental Health
 +
|Pages=97–121
 
|URL=https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-98228-1_5
 
|URL=https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-98228-1_5
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-98228-1_5
+
|DOI=10.1007/978-3-319-98228-1_5
 
|Abstract=Power and hierarchy are key themes in MDT interactions. The literature suggests they can lead to some clinicians not being heard, with negative consequences for assessments. Power and hierarchy can be considered as relational, best studied as one person talks to another. Applying a conversation analysis approach, we introduced epistemic and deontic status and stance as key analytic tools. We show how respect can be shown for the professional knowledge of others and how this can be usurped, for example through a lack of historical knowledge of a person. We illustrate how groups can manage, drown out and challenge the epistemic status of a team member (in this case the psychiatrist). Findings illustrated interactional practices where professional hierarchies were shown to have less impact.
 
|Abstract=Power and hierarchy are key themes in MDT interactions. The literature suggests they can lead to some clinicians not being heard, with negative consequences for assessments. Power and hierarchy can be considered as relational, best studied as one person talks to another. Applying a conversation analysis approach, we introduced epistemic and deontic status and stance as key analytic tools. We show how respect can be shown for the professional knowledge of others and how this can be usurped, for example through a lack of historical knowledge of a person. We illustrate how groups can manage, drown out and challenge the epistemic status of a team member (in this case the psychiatrist). Findings illustrated interactional practices where professional hierarchies were shown to have less impact.
 
}}
 
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Latest revision as of 08:36, 16 January 2020

Smart-etal2019a
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Smart-etal2019a
Author(s) Cordet Smart, Christianne Pollock, Lindsay Aikman, Erica Willoughby
Title Power struggles in MDT meetings: using different orders of interaction to understand the interplay of hierarchy, knowledge and accountability
Editor(s) Cordet Smart, Timothy Auburn
Tag(s) EMCA, Power, Hierarchy, Deontics, Epistemics, Professional Meetings
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Year 2019
Language English
City Cham
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 97–121
URL Link
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-98228-1_5
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title Interprofessional Care and Mental Health: The Language of Mental Health
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

Power and hierarchy are key themes in MDT interactions. The literature suggests they can lead to some clinicians not being heard, with negative consequences for assessments. Power and hierarchy can be considered as relational, best studied as one person talks to another. Applying a conversation analysis approach, we introduced epistemic and deontic status and stance as key analytic tools. We show how respect can be shown for the professional knowledge of others and how this can be usurped, for example through a lack of historical knowledge of a person. We illustrate how groups can manage, drown out and challenge the epistemic status of a team member (in this case the psychiatrist). Findings illustrated interactional practices where professional hierarchies were shown to have less impact.

Notes