Difference between revisions of "Scarpetta-Spagnolli2009"

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|Author(s)=Fabiola Scarpetta; Anna Spagnolli;
 
|Author(s)=Fabiola Scarpetta; Anna Spagnolli;
 
|Title=The interactional context of humor in stand-up comedy
 
|Title=The interactional context of humor in stand-up comedy
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Comedy; Humor; Joke sequences
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Comedy; Humor; Joke sequences; Racism
 
|Key=Scarpetta-Spagnolli2009
 
|Key=Scarpetta-Spagnolli2009
 
|Year=2009
 
|Year=2009

Latest revision as of 14:47, 11 June 2020

Scarpetta-Spagnolli2009
BibType ARTICLE
Key Scarpetta-Spagnolli2009
Author(s) Fabiola Scarpetta, Anna Spagnolli
Title The interactional context of humor in stand-up comedy
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Comedy, Humor, Joke sequences, Racism
Publisher
Year 2009
Language English
City
Month
Journal Research on Language and Social Interaction
Volume 42
Number 3
Pages 210–230
URL Link
DOI 10.1080/08351810903089159
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Four shows, performed by African American stand-up comedians in Los Angeles in front of Black audiences and White audiences, were examined. The different sections of the events and the components of the joke sequences are analyzed, looking for aspects that facilitate joke acceptability and finding that audience-referred jokes are resorted to differently in Black rooms and White rooms, and punch lines can be followed by accounts even though the audience affiliated to them. In addition to these practices, other resources show an intention to relate with the audience, such as questions that involve the audience in the show and jokes that gravitate to parties in the event. Finally, the evidence shows that the whole event unfolds as an informal, naturally developing encounter between audience and comedian, thanks to a colloquial register, fillers allowing transition across joke sequences, and “pags” that expand previous punch lines positively received by the audience. It is argued that through these resources the interactional context of a joke is constantly oriented to and shaped to be an informal environment where jokes on sensitive topics, such as sex and race, can be accepted more easily.

Notes