Difference between revisions of "Rydell2019"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Maria Rydell |Title=Negotiating co-participation: Embodied word searching sequences in paired L2 speaking tests |Tag(s)=EMCA; Embodied w...")
 
 
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|Journal=Journal of Pragmatics
 
|Journal=Journal of Pragmatics
 
|Volume=149
 
|Volume=149
|Pages=60-77
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|Pages=60–77
|URL=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2019.05.027
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|URL=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378216618304430
 
|DOI=10.1016/j.pragma.2019.05.027
 
|DOI=10.1016/j.pragma.2019.05.027
|Abstract=This study explores embodied word searching sequences in paired L2 speaking tests in a
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|Abstract=This study explores embodied word searching sequences in paired L2 speaking tests in a national test in basic Swedish for adult migrants in Sweden. A particular focus is given to sequences where the speaker invites the interlocutor to participate in the search and to extended word searches where co-participation is negotiated in different ways. Drawing on an embodied interactional analysis of 27 video recorded paired speaking tests, this study shows how embodied semiotic resources are used both to negotiate participation in the word searching sequences and to display an avoidance to participate in the word search even when being invited to do so. Overall, the participants prioritize the progressivity of talk rather than pursuing lexical precision. This study argues that the test takers' awareness of being assessed can have an impact on how they perform the word searches. Finally, the study makes the case that even though word search behavior is similar across languages, it remains important to treat word searching as a contextualized interactional practice.
national test in basic Swedish for adult migrants in Sweden. A particular focus is given to
 
sequences where the speaker invites the interlocutor to participate in the search and to
 
extended word searches where co-participation is negotiated in different ways. Drawing
 
on an embodied interactional analysis of 27 video recorded paired speaking tests, this
 
study shows how embodied semiotic resources are used both to negotiate participation in
 
the word searching sequences and to display an avoidance to participate in the word
 
search even when being invited to do so. Overall, the participants prioritize the progres-
 
sivity of talk rather than pursuing lexical precision. This study argues that the test takers'
 
awareness of being assessed can have an impact on how they perform the word searches.
 
Finally, the study makes the case that even though word search behavior is similar across
 
languages, it remains important to treat word searching as a contextualized interactional
 
practice.
 
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 08:53, 16 January 2020

Rydell2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Rydell2019
Author(s) Maria Rydell
Title Negotiating co-participation: Embodied word searching sequences in paired L2 speaking tests
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Embodied word searching sequences, Second language interaction, Language testing, Institutional performance
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Journal of Pragmatics
Volume 149
Number
Pages 60–77
URL Link
DOI 10.1016/j.pragma.2019.05.027
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This study explores embodied word searching sequences in paired L2 speaking tests in a national test in basic Swedish for adult migrants in Sweden. A particular focus is given to sequences where the speaker invites the interlocutor to participate in the search and to extended word searches where co-participation is negotiated in different ways. Drawing on an embodied interactional analysis of 27 video recorded paired speaking tests, this study shows how embodied semiotic resources are used both to negotiate participation in the word searching sequences and to display an avoidance to participate in the word search even when being invited to do so. Overall, the participants prioritize the progressivity of talk rather than pursuing lexical precision. This study argues that the test takers' awareness of being assessed can have an impact on how they perform the word searches. Finally, the study makes the case that even though word search behavior is similar across languages, it remains important to treat word searching as a contextualized interactional practice.

Notes