Difference between revisions of "Roberts2006"

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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
 +
|BibType=ARTICLE
 +
|Author(s)=Felicia Roberts; Alexander L. Francis; Melanie Morgan;
 +
|Title=The interaction of inter-turn silence with prosodic cues in listener perceptions of “trouble” in conversation
 +
|Tag(s)=Silence; Prosody; Pausing; Human conversation; Word duration; EMCA
 
|Key=Roberts2006
 
|Key=Roberts2006
|Key=Roberts2006
 
|Title=The interaction of inter-turn silence with prosodic cues in listener perceptions of \textquotedbllefttrouble\textquotedblright in conversation
 
|Author(s)=Felicia Roberts; Alexander L. Francis; Melanie Morgan;
 
|Tag(s)=Silence; Prosody; Pausing; Human conversation; Word duration; EMCA
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|Publisher=Elsevier BV
 
 
|Year=2006
 
|Year=2006
|Month=sep
 
 
|Journal=Speech Communication
 
|Journal=Speech Communication
 
|Volume=48
 
|Volume=48
 
|Number=9
 
|Number=9
 
|Pages=1079–1093
 
|Pages=1079–1093
 +
|URL=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0167639306000148
 
|DOI=10.1016/j.specom.2006.02.001
 
|DOI=10.1016/j.specom.2006.02.001
 
|Abstract=The forms, functions, and organization of sounds and utterances are generally the focus of speech communication research; little is known, however, about how the silence between speaker turns shades the meaning of the surrounding talk. We use an experimental protocol to test whether listeners’ perception of trouble in interaction (e.g., disagreement or unwillingness) varies when prosodic cues are manipulated in the context of 2 speech acts (requests and assessments). The prosodic cues investigated were inter-turn silence and the duration, absolute pitch, and pitch contour of affirmative response tokens (“yeah” and “sure”) that followed the inter-turn silence. Study participants evaluated spoken dialogues simulating telephone calls between friends in which the length of silence following a request/assessment (i.e., the inter-turn silence) was manipulated in Praat as were prosodic features of the responses. Results indicate that with each incremental increase in pause duration (0–600–1200ms) listeners perceived increasingly less willingness to comply with requests and increasingly weaker agreement with assessments. Inter-turn silence and duration of response token proved to be stronger cues to unwillingness and disagreement than did the response token’s pitch characteristics. However, listeners tend to perceive response token duration as a cue to “trouble” when inter-turn silence cues were, apparently, ambiguous (less than 1s).
 
|Abstract=The forms, functions, and organization of sounds and utterances are generally the focus of speech communication research; little is known, however, about how the silence between speaker turns shades the meaning of the surrounding talk. We use an experimental protocol to test whether listeners’ perception of trouble in interaction (e.g., disagreement or unwillingness) varies when prosodic cues are manipulated in the context of 2 speech acts (requests and assessments). The prosodic cues investigated were inter-turn silence and the duration, absolute pitch, and pitch contour of affirmative response tokens (“yeah” and “sure”) that followed the inter-turn silence. Study participants evaluated spoken dialogues simulating telephone calls between friends in which the length of silence following a request/assessment (i.e., the inter-turn silence) was manipulated in Praat as were prosodic features of the responses. Results indicate that with each incremental increase in pause duration (0–600–1200ms) listeners perceived increasingly less willingness to comply with requests and increasingly weaker agreement with assessments. Inter-turn silence and duration of response token proved to be stronger cues to unwillingness and disagreement than did the response token’s pitch characteristics. However, listeners tend to perceive response token duration as a cue to “trouble” when inter-turn silence cues were, apparently, ambiguous (less than 1s).
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 15:05, 10 November 2019

Roberts2006
BibType ARTICLE
Key Roberts2006
Author(s) Felicia Roberts, Alexander L. Francis, Melanie Morgan
Title The interaction of inter-turn silence with prosodic cues in listener perceptions of “trouble” in conversation
Editor(s)
Tag(s) Silence, Prosody, Pausing, Human conversation, Word duration, EMCA
Publisher
Year 2006
Language
City
Month
Journal Speech Communication
Volume 48
Number 9
Pages 1079–1093
URL Link
DOI 10.1016/j.specom.2006.02.001
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

The forms, functions, and organization of sounds and utterances are generally the focus of speech communication research; little is known, however, about how the silence between speaker turns shades the meaning of the surrounding talk. We use an experimental protocol to test whether listeners’ perception of trouble in interaction (e.g., disagreement or unwillingness) varies when prosodic cues are manipulated in the context of 2 speech acts (requests and assessments). The prosodic cues investigated were inter-turn silence and the duration, absolute pitch, and pitch contour of affirmative response tokens (“yeah” and “sure”) that followed the inter-turn silence. Study participants evaluated spoken dialogues simulating telephone calls between friends in which the length of silence following a request/assessment (i.e., the inter-turn silence) was manipulated in Praat as were prosodic features of the responses. Results indicate that with each incremental increase in pause duration (0–600–1200ms) listeners perceived increasingly less willingness to comply with requests and increasingly weaker agreement with assessments. Inter-turn silence and duration of response token proved to be stronger cues to unwillingness and disagreement than did the response token’s pitch characteristics. However, listeners tend to perceive response token duration as a cue to “trouble” when inter-turn silence cues were, apparently, ambiguous (less than 1s).

Notes