Difference between revisions of "Raymond-Sidnell2019"

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|Author(s)=Geoffrey Raymond; Jack Sidnell;
 
|Author(s)=Geoffrey Raymond; Jack Sidnell;
|Title=Interaction at the Boundaries of a World Known in Common: Initiating Repair with “What Do You Mean?”
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|Title=Interaction at the boundaries of a world known in common: initiating repair with “What do you nean?”
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Repair initiation
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Repair initiation
 
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|Volume=52
 
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|URL=https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2019.1608100
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|URL=https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08351813.2019.1608100
 
|DOI=10.1080/08351813.2019.1608100
 
|DOI=10.1080/08351813.2019.1608100
|Abstract=A recurrent feature of Garfinkel’s famous breaching experiments in which stu-
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|Abstract=A recurrent feature of Garfinkel’s famous breaching experiments in which student confederates were instructed to engage an unsuspecting subject in conversation and subsequently insist that they “clarify the sense of (their) commonplace remarks” is the student experimenter’s use, in attempting to realize such “insistence,” of a turn composed of “what do you mean” plus a repetition of some part of the prior talk. Garfinkel suggested that such utterances tended to provoke moral outrage. The analysis presented here aims to explicate just how such utterances work, how they intersect with assumptions about the distribution of knowledge between participants to interaction, and why they might elicit such strong reactions from those to whom they are directed. Data are in American and Canadian English.
dent confederates were instructed to engage an unsuspecting subject in con-
 
versation and subsequently insist that they “clarify the sense of (their)
 
commonplace remarks” is the student experimenter’suse,inattemptingto
 
realize such “insistence,” of a turn composed of “what do you mean” plus
 
a repetition of some part of the prior talk. Garfinkel suggested that such utter-
 
ances tended to provoke moral outrage. The analysis presented here aims to
 
explicate just how such utterances work, how they intersect with assumptions
 
about the distribution of knowledge between participants to interaction, and
 
why they might elicit such strong reactions from those to whom they are
 
directed. Data are in American and Canadian English.
 
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 09:39, 16 January 2020

Raymond-Sidnell2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Raymond-Sidnell2019
Author(s) Geoffrey Raymond, Jack Sidnell
Title Interaction at the boundaries of a world known in common: initiating repair with “What do you nean?”
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Repair initiation
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Research on Language and Social Interaction
Volume 52
Number 2
Pages 177–192
URL Link
DOI 10.1080/08351813.2019.1608100
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

A recurrent feature of Garfinkel’s famous breaching experiments in which student confederates were instructed to engage an unsuspecting subject in conversation and subsequently insist that they “clarify the sense of (their) commonplace remarks” is the student experimenter’s use, in attempting to realize such “insistence,” of a turn composed of “what do you mean” plus a repetition of some part of the prior talk. Garfinkel suggested that such utterances tended to provoke moral outrage. The analysis presented here aims to explicate just how such utterances work, how they intersect with assumptions about the distribution of knowledge between participants to interaction, and why they might elicit such strong reactions from those to whom they are directed. Data are in American and Canadian English.

Notes