Difference between revisions of "Oswick-Richards2004"

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|URL= https://doi.org/10.1080/14759550420002533404
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|URL=https://doi.org/10.1080/14759550420002533404
 
|DOI=10.1080/14759550420002533404
 
|DOI=10.1080/14759550420002533404
 
|Abstract=In this paper the relationship between local conversations and wider perspectives in organizations is explored and critiqued initially through an examination of the concept of ‘conversational lamination’ (Boden, 1994). It is argued at the outset that the metaphor of lamination promotes an inherently univocal account of the role and status of conversations in organizational settings. This perspective is challenged through the deployment of
 
|Abstract=In this paper the relationship between local conversations and wider perspectives in organizations is explored and critiqued initially through an examination of the concept of ‘conversational lamination’ (Boden, 1994). It is argued at the outset that the metaphor of lamination promotes an inherently univocal account of the role and status of conversations in organizational settings. This perspective is challenged through the deployment of
 
counter-metaphors based upon alternative epistemological assumptions (i.e., critical management, postmodernism, and new science). The implications for ethnomethodology and conversation analysis of thinking about the relationship between localised-interaction and organizational phenomena in a more plurivocal way are discussed. Boden’s work on the notion of lamination is then set in a context, showing it as an appropriate and understandable part of her work on bringing ethnomethodology to life for analysts from many different fields.
 
counter-metaphors based upon alternative epistemological assumptions (i.e., critical management, postmodernism, and new science). The implications for ethnomethodology and conversation analysis of thinking about the relationship between localised-interaction and organizational phenomena in a more plurivocal way are discussed. Boden’s work on the notion of lamination is then set in a context, showing it as an appropriate and understandable part of her work on bringing ethnomethodology to life for analysts from many different fields.
 
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Latest revision as of 20:28, 12 July 2019

Oswick-Richards2004
BibType ARTICLE
Key Oswick-Richards2004
Author(s) Cliff Oswick, David Richards
Title Talk in organizations: local conversations, wider perspectives
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Talk, Organizations, Deidre Boden, Conversation Analysis, Conversational Lamination
Publisher
Year 2004
Language English
City
Month
Journal Culture and Organization
Volume 10
Number 2
Pages 107–123
URL Link
DOI 10.1080/14759550420002533404
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this paper the relationship between local conversations and wider perspectives in organizations is explored and critiqued initially through an examination of the concept of ‘conversational lamination’ (Boden, 1994). It is argued at the outset that the metaphor of lamination promotes an inherently univocal account of the role and status of conversations in organizational settings. This perspective is challenged through the deployment of counter-metaphors based upon alternative epistemological assumptions (i.e., critical management, postmodernism, and new science). The implications for ethnomethodology and conversation analysis of thinking about the relationship between localised-interaction and organizational phenomena in a more plurivocal way are discussed. Boden’s work on the notion of lamination is then set in a context, showing it as an appropriate and understandable part of her work on bringing ethnomethodology to life for analysts from many different fields.

Notes