Difference between revisions of "Nozawa2020"

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Revision as of 02:44, 3 January 2020

Nozawa2020
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Nozawa2020
Author(s) Yukako Nozawa
Title Co-construction of Cognitive Empathy between Student Doctors and Simulated Patients in English as a Lingua Franca
Editor(s) M. Konakahara, K. Tsuchiya
Tag(s) EMCA, In press, Japanese, Empathy, English as a lingua franca, Medical interaction
Publisher
Year 2020
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 279-298
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-33288-4_13
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title English as a Lingua Franca in Japan
Chapter

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Abstract

This chapter explores the role of repetition for expressing cognitive empathy during simulated primary care medical consultation between Japanese and non-Japanese student doctors and simulated patients (SPs) from different lingua-cultural backgrounds in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), using conversation analysis. “Empathy” in medicine has been discussed in a number of extensive literatures, but empathy practice in doctor–patient communication in ELF has rarely been investigated. This chapter adopts the definition of empathy in patient care by Hojat (Empathy in Patient Care: Antecedents, Development, Measurement, and Outcomes. Springer, New York, 2007) and empathy categories by Duan and Hill (J Couns Psychol 43:261–274, 1996) and examines how the student doctors express cognitive empathy, that is, the student doctors’ understanding of the SP’s state by using repetition, which has been argued as the effective strategies for co-constructing mutual understanding and accommodation in ELF communication. The analysis section compares two cases of medical interview in ELF and provides an emic perspective on how cognitive empathy is delivered and received.

Notes