Difference between revisions of "Mondada2018d"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Lorenza Mondada; |Title=Driving instruction at high speed on a race circuit: Issues in action formation and sequence organization |Tag(...")
 
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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
|Author(s)=Lorenza Mondada;  
+
|Author(s)=Lorenza Mondada;
 
|Title=Driving instruction at high speed on a race circuit: Issues in action formation and sequence organization
 
|Title=Driving instruction at high speed on a race circuit: Issues in action formation and sequence organization
|Tag(s)=EMCA; In Press; Driving; Sequence organization; Instructional settings;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Driving; Sequence organization; Instructional settings; Indexicality; series of sequences; Multimodality
 
|Key=Mondada2018d
 
|Key=Mondada2018d
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=International Journal of Applied Linguistics
 
|Journal=International Journal of Applied Linguistics
 +
|Volume=28
 +
|Number=2
 +
|Pages=304-325
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijal.12202
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijal.12202
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12202
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12202
 
|Abstract=The paper deals with instructions in a specific instructional setting, in which a driver learns to drive on a race circuit, assisted by a coach helping him to improve his performance and speed. This setting opens up both original issues for the study of learning to drive a car and general issues concerning the praxeological, multimodal, and sequential analysis of instructions in an ethnomethodological and conversation analytic (EMCA) perspective. On the basis of a systematic analysis of the coach's instructions and the driver's responses, the paper reveals the situated methodic production and understanding of these instructions and their organization in sequences and series of sequences. Training to drive at high speed appears as a perspicuous setting for investigating the ecology and the indexicality of instructed action, its temporal features, and the way these feature affect sequentiality—in particular action formation and sequence organization.
 
|Abstract=The paper deals with instructions in a specific instructional setting, in which a driver learns to drive on a race circuit, assisted by a coach helping him to improve his performance and speed. This setting opens up both original issues for the study of learning to drive a car and general issues concerning the praxeological, multimodal, and sequential analysis of instructions in an ethnomethodological and conversation analytic (EMCA) perspective. On the basis of a systematic analysis of the coach's instructions and the driver's responses, the paper reveals the situated methodic production and understanding of these instructions and their organization in sequences and series of sequences. Training to drive at high speed appears as a perspicuous setting for investigating the ecology and the indexicality of instructed action, its temporal features, and the way these feature affect sequentiality—in particular action formation and sequence organization.
 
 
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 10:16, 14 August 2018

Mondada2018d
BibType ARTICLE
Key Mondada2018d
Author(s) Lorenza Mondada
Title Driving instruction at high speed on a race circuit: Issues in action formation and sequence organization
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Driving, Sequence organization, Instructional settings, Indexicality, series of sequences, Multimodality
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal International Journal of Applied Linguistics
Volume 28
Number 2
Pages 304-325
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12202
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

The paper deals with instructions in a specific instructional setting, in which a driver learns to drive on a race circuit, assisted by a coach helping him to improve his performance and speed. This setting opens up both original issues for the study of learning to drive a car and general issues concerning the praxeological, multimodal, and sequential analysis of instructions in an ethnomethodological and conversation analytic (EMCA) perspective. On the basis of a systematic analysis of the coach's instructions and the driver's responses, the paper reveals the situated methodic production and understanding of these instructions and their organization in sequences and series of sequences. Training to drive at high speed appears as a perspicuous setting for investigating the ecology and the indexicality of instructed action, its temporal features, and the way these feature affect sequentiality—in particular action formation and sequence organization.

Notes