Difference between revisions of "Lawless2001"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=John J. Lawless; Jerry E. Gale; Gonzalo Bacigalupe |Title=The Discourse of Race and Culture in Family Therapy Supervision: A Conversatio...")
 
 
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|Author(s)=John J. Lawless; Jerry E. Gale; Gonzalo Bacigalupe
 
|Author(s)=John J. Lawless; Jerry E. Gale; Gonzalo Bacigalupe
 
|Title=The Discourse of Race and Culture in Family Therapy Supervision: A Conversation Analysis
 
|Title=The Discourse of Race and Culture in Family Therapy Supervision: A Conversation Analysis
|Tag(s)=EMCA; family therapy supervision; ethnicity; culture
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|Tag(s)=EMCA; family therapy supervision; ethnicity; culture; Racism
 
|Key=Lawless2001
 
|Key=Lawless2001
 
|Year=2001
 
|Year=2001

Latest revision as of 14:46, 11 June 2020

Lawless2001
BibType ARTICLE
Key Lawless2001
Author(s) John J. Lawless, Jerry E. Gale, Gonzalo Bacigalupe
Title The Discourse of Race and Culture in Family Therapy Supervision: A Conversation Analysis
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, family therapy supervision, ethnicity, culture, Racism
Publisher
Year 2001
Language
City
Month
Journal Contemporary Family Therapy
Volume 23
Number 2
Pages 181–197
URL Link
DOI 10.1023/A:1011198219209
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Family therapy literature has emphasized the importance of examining contextual variables in supervision. This study explored how the talk of race, ethnicity, and culture is accomplished within the supervision session using conversation analysis. Conversation analysis is a naturalistic and descriptive methodology that examines patterns across naturally occurring conversations. The results indicated that the participants accomplished four domains of talk that involved the discourse of race, ethnicity, or culture. These domains included contextual markers, self of the therapist issues, cross cultural issues in the therapeutic relationship and cultural issues affecting the supervisory relationship. Implications for supervision and future directions are discussed.

Notes