Difference between revisions of "Kim2013"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Hye Ri Stephanie Kim; |Title=Constructing “an Institution”: A Case from a Korean Student Group Meeting |Tag(s)=EMCA; Institutional;...")
 
 
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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
|Author(s)=Hye Ri Stephanie Kim;  
+
|Author(s)=Hye Ri Stephanie Kim;
 
|Title=Constructing “an Institution”: A Case from a Korean Student Group Meeting
 
|Title=Constructing “an Institution”: A Case from a Korean Student Group Meeting
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Institutional; Korean; Student Group;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Institutional; Korean; Student Group;
 
|Key=Kim2013
 
|Key=Kim2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Journal=Issues in Applied Linguistics
 
|Journal=Issues in Applied Linguistics
 
|Volume=19
 
|Volume=19
|Pages=27-62
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|Pages=27–62
 
|URL=http://escholarship.org/uc/item/344460jb
 
|URL=http://escholarship.org/uc/item/344460jb
|Abstract=Using Conversation Analysis,  this study describes how  ‘institutionality’  is accomplished  in  talk-in-interaction by analyzing how the Korean student group members construct themselves as ‘an institution’ through decision-making. Most conversation-analytic research on institutional talk has been of occupational settings. This study, with data from a voluntary student staff group whose meetings are sporadic and without formal phases, illustrates that the group members’ interaction reveals how  they  construct  themselves as a decision-making group whose members embody different  social  roles, and ultimately as an  institution. Two  significant practices are discussed.
+
|Abstract=Using Conversation Analysis,  this study describes how  ‘institutionality’  is accomplished  in  talk-in-interaction by analyzing how the Korean student group members construct themselves as ‘an institution’ through decision-making. Most conversation-analytic research on institutional talk has been of occupational settings. This study, with data from a voluntary student staff group whose meetings are sporadic and without formal phases, illustrates that the group members’ interaction reveals how  they  construct  themselves as a decision-making group whose members embody different  social  roles, and ultimately as an  institution. Two  significant practices are discussed. First,  the data show  that  the members actively search  for precedents, which  later become  the most crucial basis for their decision-making. Second, as a strategy of gathering power over others within their institutional boundary, the members frequently depart from the preference structure of ordinary conversation. Overall, this paper contributes to a better understanding of institutionality with data from a quasi-institutional setting in the relatively under-examined language, Korean.
First,  the data show  that  the members actively search  for precedents, which  later become  the most crucial basis for their decision-making. Second, as a strategy of gathering power over others within their institutional boundary, the members frequently depart from the preference structure of ordinary conversation. Overall, this paper contributes to a better understanding of institutionality with data from a quasi-institutional setting in the relatively under-examined language, Korean.  
 
 
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Latest revision as of 13:27, 4 December 2019

Kim2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Kim2013
Author(s) Hye Ri Stephanie Kim
Title Constructing “an Institution”: A Case from a Korean Student Group Meeting
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Institutional, Korean, Student Group
Publisher
Year 2013
Language
City
Month
Journal Issues in Applied Linguistics
Volume 19
Number
Pages 27–62
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

Using Conversation Analysis, this study describes how ‘institutionality’ is accomplished in talk-in-interaction by analyzing how the Korean student group members construct themselves as ‘an institution’ through decision-making. Most conversation-analytic research on institutional talk has been of occupational settings. This study, with data from a voluntary student staff group whose meetings are sporadic and without formal phases, illustrates that the group members’ interaction reveals how they construct themselves as a decision-making group whose members embody different social roles, and ultimately as an institution. Two significant practices are discussed. First, the data show that the members actively search for precedents, which later become the most crucial basis for their decision-making. Second, as a strategy of gathering power over others within their institutional boundary, the members frequently depart from the preference structure of ordinary conversation. Overall, this paper contributes to a better understanding of institutionality with data from a quasi-institutional setting in the relatively under-examined language, Korean.

Notes