Difference between revisions of "Kawashima-Maynard2019"

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Kawashima-Maynard2019
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Kawashima-Maynard2019
Author(s) Michie Kawashima, Douglas W. Maynard
Title The Social Organization of Echolalia in Clinical Encounters Involving a Child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Editor(s) Joyce Lamerichs, Susan Danby, Amanda Bateman, Stuart Ekberg
Tag(s) EMCA, Echolalia, Children, Mental health, ASD, Autism
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 49-72
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28426-8_3
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title Children and Mental Health Talk: Perspectives on Social Competence
Chapter

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Abstract

Children with developmental disabilities face stigma and stereotyping from others in their lives, associated with their perceived incompetence in or inability to interact with others (Gray in Sociol Health & Illn 24: 734–749, 2002). Echolalia, which refers to the automatic repetition of words or phrases, is a characteristic speech pattern of individuals who meet the diagnostic criteria of what is currently known as Autism Spectrum Disorder and are at risk for stigmatization and stereotyping (DSM 5th, 2013). Echolalia often presents in early childhood and is generally viewed as an indication of Autism Spectrum Disorder—particularly, as a symptom of the communication deficit—in clinical settings. In this chapter, we examine whether echolalia as a speech pattern has different interactional functions depending on its sequential location in clinical conversations. We analyzed two videotaped clinical sessions between a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder and clinicians, which included several test batteries. We focused on how echolalia in the interaction between the child and professionals emerges within the standardized tasks that the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder had to perform.

Notes