Difference between revisions of "Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2018"

From emcawiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Clair-AntoineVeyrier moved page Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2016 to Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2018 without leaving a redirect: year)
(key issue)
Line 4: Line 4:
 
|Title=Video in Sociomaterial Investigations: A Solution to the Problem of Relevance for Organizational Research
 
|Title=Video in Sociomaterial Investigations: A Solution to the Problem of Relevance for Organizational Research
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; sociomateriality; relevance; video; ethnomethodology; conversation analysis;
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; sociomateriality; relevance; video; ethnomethodology; conversation analysis;
|Key=Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2016
+
|Key=Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English

Revision as of 08:25, 11 July 2018

Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2018
BibType ARTICLE
Key Hindmarsh-Llewellyn2018
Author(s) Jon Hindmarsh, Nick Llewellyn
Title Video in Sociomaterial Investigations: A Solution to the Problem of Relevance for Organizational Research
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, sociomateriality, relevance, video, ethnomethodology, conversation analysis
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal Organizational Research Methods
Volume 21
Number 2
Pages 412-437
URL
DOI https://doi.org/10.1177/1094428116657595
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This article considers the application of video-based research to address methodological challenges for organizational scholars concerned with the sociomaterial foundations to work practice. In particular the claim that “all practices are always sociomaterial” raises a “problem of relevance”—that is, on what grounds can we select material to include in the analytic account when there is a vast array of material in each setting? Furthermore, how can we grasp the sociality of material objects that are often taken for granted and that drift in and out of view? We address these methodological questions drawing on ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, and by making use of video recordings of everyday work and organizing. We demonstrate the approach with data from two service settings and explore the analysis both of single cases and collections. To conclude, the article considers the distinctive contributions that these video-based studies have for our understanding of sociomateriality and organizational practice more generally.

Notes