Difference between revisions of "Heaphy2013"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Emily D. Heaphy |Title=Repairing Breaches with Rules: Maintaining Institutions in the Face of Everyday Disruptions |Tag(s)=EMCA; institu...")
 
 
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|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|Author(s)=Emily D. Heaphy
 
|Author(s)=Emily D. Heaphy
|Title=Repairing Breaches with Rules: Maintaining Institutions in the Face of Everyday Disruptions
+
|Title=Repairing breaches with rules: maintaining institutions in the face of everyday disruptions
|Tag(s)=EMCA; institutional work; ethnomethodology; breaches; agency; rules; pressure; specialists; roles;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; institutional work; ethnomethodology; breaches; agency; rules; pressure; specialists; roles;
 
|Key=Heaphy2013
 
|Key=Heaphy2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
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|Volume=24
 
|Volume=24
 
|Number=5
 
|Number=5
|Pages=1291 - 1315
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|Pages=1291–1315
|URL=https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.1120.0798
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|URL=https://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/orsc.1120.0798
|Abstract=This study reveals the institutional work required to maintain taken-for-granted beliefs about roles in the face of everyday breaches of role expectations. Through a comparative qualitative study of hospital-employed patient advocates in teaching and Veterans Health Administration hospitals, I demonstrate that patient advocates repair breaches in the taken-for-granted beliefs about the patient, family, and staff roles in hospitals. My research shows that patient advocates skillfully used rules—or formal policies and procedures—to restore, clarify, or initiate organizational changes in rules, all to maintain institutionalized role expectations. This analysis expands our understanding of the work of maintaining institutions by specifying how constellations of roles are maintained in the face of breaches of role expectations and across different institutional contexts. It highlights the roles of pressure specialists and furthers theorizing on individual agency by specifying how rules can be source of individual agency
+
|DOI=10.1287/orsc.1120.0798
 +
|Abstract=This study reveals the institutional work required to maintain taken-for-granted beliefs about roles in the face of everyday breaches of role expectations. Through a comparative qualitative study of hospital-employed patient advocates in teaching and Veterans Health Administration hospitals, I demonstrate that patient advocates repair breaches in the taken-for-granted beliefs about the patient, family, and staff roles in hospitals. My research shows that patient advocates skillfully used rules—or formal policies and procedures—to restore, clarify, or initiate organizational changes in rules, all to maintain institutionalized role expectations. This analysis expands our understanding of the work of maintaining institutions by specifying how constellations of roles are maintained in the face of breaches of role expectations and across different institutional contexts. It highlights the roles of pressure specialists and furthers theorizing on individual agency by specifying how rules can be source of individual agency.
 
}}
 
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Latest revision as of 14:20, 4 December 2019

Heaphy2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Heaphy2013
Author(s) Emily D. Heaphy
Title Repairing breaches with rules: maintaining institutions in the face of everyday disruptions
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, institutional work, ethnomethodology, breaches, agency, rules, pressure, specialists, roles
Publisher
Year 2013
Language English
City
Month
Journal Organization Science
Volume 24
Number 5
Pages 1291–1315
URL Link
DOI 10.1287/orsc.1120.0798
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This study reveals the institutional work required to maintain taken-for-granted beliefs about roles in the face of everyday breaches of role expectations. Through a comparative qualitative study of hospital-employed patient advocates in teaching and Veterans Health Administration hospitals, I demonstrate that patient advocates repair breaches in the taken-for-granted beliefs about the patient, family, and staff roles in hospitals. My research shows that patient advocates skillfully used rules—or formal policies and procedures—to restore, clarify, or initiate organizational changes in rules, all to maintain institutionalized role expectations. This analysis expands our understanding of the work of maintaining institutions by specifying how constellations of roles are maintained in the face of breaches of role expectations and across different institutional contexts. It highlights the roles of pressure specialists and furthers theorizing on individual agency by specifying how rules can be source of individual agency.

Notes