Difference between revisions of "Harris2013"

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|Author(s)=Jess Harris; Paula Jervis-Tracey; Jayne Keogh
 
|Author(s)=Jess Harris; Paula Jervis-Tracey; Jayne Keogh
 
|Title=Doing collaborative reflection in the professional experience
 
|Title=Doing collaborative reflection in the professional experience
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Teachers; Training; Professional competence;  
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|Tag(s)=EMCA; Teachers; Training; Professional competence;
 
|Key=Harris2013
 
|Key=Harris2013
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
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|Number=2
 
|Number=2
 
|Pages=33–45
 
|Pages=33–45
|URL=http://austjourcomm.org/index.php/ajc/article/view/5/58
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|URL=https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=823673050017945;res=IELAPA
 
|Abstract=Despite the importance of the school-based practicum experience in teacher education programs, only limited research has investigated how supervising and pre-service teacher roles and relationships are interactively achieved in situ. Using conversation analysis, we interrogate extracts of practicum talk between supervising teachers (STs) and their pre-service teachers (PTs), revealing that asymmetrical relationships are talked into being within and through their conversations about classroom practice. We compare the different structural conversational arrangements that are employed when STs provide either positive feedback or raise issues of potential difficulty in relation to their PTs’ observed classroom activities. Analysis reveals that STs tend to make evaluative statements when providing positive feedback, in contrast to initiating a process of critical reflection when talking about the need for improvements in PTs’ pedagogic practices. We conclude by arguing the need for STs to instigate sustained critical and collaborative professional conversations with their PTs during the practicum experience, enabling them to engage in reflective practice and providing them with opportunities to extend their professional knowledge and skills, thereby potentially improving their future classroom practices.
 
|Abstract=Despite the importance of the school-based practicum experience in teacher education programs, only limited research has investigated how supervising and pre-service teacher roles and relationships are interactively achieved in situ. Using conversation analysis, we interrogate extracts of practicum talk between supervising teachers (STs) and their pre-service teachers (PTs), revealing that asymmetrical relationships are talked into being within and through their conversations about classroom practice. We compare the different structural conversational arrangements that are employed when STs provide either positive feedback or raise issues of potential difficulty in relation to their PTs’ observed classroom activities. Analysis reveals that STs tend to make evaluative statements when providing positive feedback, in contrast to initiating a process of critical reflection when talking about the need for improvements in PTs’ pedagogic practices. We conclude by arguing the need for STs to instigate sustained critical and collaborative professional conversations with their PTs during the practicum experience, enabling them to engage in reflective practice and providing them with opportunities to extend their professional knowledge and skills, thereby potentially improving their future classroom practices.
 
}}
 
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Latest revision as of 14:24, 4 December 2019

Harris2013
BibType ARTICLE
Key Harris2013
Author(s) Jess Harris, Paula Jervis-Tracey, Jayne Keogh
Title Doing collaborative reflection in the professional experience
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Teachers, Training, Professional competence
Publisher
Year 2013
Language
City
Month
Journal Australian Journal of Communication
Volume 40
Number 2
Pages 33–45
URL Link
DOI
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Despite the importance of the school-based practicum experience in teacher education programs, only limited research has investigated how supervising and pre-service teacher roles and relationships are interactively achieved in situ. Using conversation analysis, we interrogate extracts of practicum talk between supervising teachers (STs) and their pre-service teachers (PTs), revealing that asymmetrical relationships are talked into being within and through their conversations about classroom practice. We compare the different structural conversational arrangements that are employed when STs provide either positive feedback or raise issues of potential difficulty in relation to their PTs’ observed classroom activities. Analysis reveals that STs tend to make evaluative statements when providing positive feedback, in contrast to initiating a process of critical reflection when talking about the need for improvements in PTs’ pedagogic practices. We conclude by arguing the need for STs to instigate sustained critical and collaborative professional conversations with their PTs during the practicum experience, enabling them to engage in reflective practice and providing them with opportunities to extend their professional knowledge and skills, thereby potentially improving their future classroom practices.

Notes