Difference between revisions of "Froholdt2011"

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|Tag(s)=EMCA; Conversation Analysis; Context; Accountability; Emotion; Culture; Emergency Calls;  
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Conversation Analysis; Context; Accountability; Emotion; Culture; Emergency Calls;  
|Key=Loloma2011
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|Key=Froholdt2011
 
|Year=2011
 
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|Journal=Text & Talk
 
|Journal=Text & Talk

Revision as of 16:58, 24 March 2019

Froholdt2011
BibType ARTICLE
Key Froholdt2011
Author(s) Lisa Loloma Froholdt
Title Getting closer to context: A case study of communication between ship and shore in an emergency situation
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Conversation Analysis, Context, Accountability, Emotion, Culture, Emergency Calls
Publisher
Year 2011
Language
City
Month
Journal Text & Talk
Volume 30
Number 4
Pages 385-402
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1515/text.2010.019
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This article argues for the use of other measures when analyzing human error in cross-cultural communication than the more traditional functionalist approaches to culture (Askehave et al., Culture in a business context, Academica, 2006), such as Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Using a case study, the behavior of a crew member in an emergency situation which was retrospectively ascribed as human error due to cultural background by a shipping company, the article analyzes what was contextually relevant for the participants and argues that cross-cultural interaction is not merely a linguistic challenge.

This article examines how accountability is managed and how nonnative speakers orient toward and manage potential human error, using an interpretative approach in the form of discursive psychology, principles of conversation analysis, and Wittgenstein's philosophy as the point of departure. The analysis discusses how the participants use different strategies to accomplish accountability in an emergency context, such as emotion categories, discursive remembering. It is argued that the interpretative approach can provide the contextual sense-making analyses that Dekker (Human Factors and Aerospace Safety 1: 247–265, 2001, Dekker, The field guide to human error investigations, Ashgate & Cranfield University Press, 2002, Dekker, The field guide to understanding human error, Ashgate, 2006) is in search of when analyzing human error (Nevile and Walker, Human Factors and Aerospace Safety 5: 109–135, 2005).

Notes