Difference between revisions of "Flood2018"

From emcawiki
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 8: Line 8:
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=Human Development
 
|Journal=Human Development
 +
|Volume=61
 +
|Number=3
 +
|Pages=145–173
 
|URL=https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/488693
 
|URL=https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/488693
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1159/000488693
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1159/000488693
 
|Abstract=A perpetual problem learners face is identifying which aspects of embodied experiences are relevant for appreciating the world in culturally specific ways. Vygotsky argued that social interactions with more competent cultural members provide arenas for linking everyday and scientific concepts. However, the precise interactional mechanisms of how these linkages are forged remain underexamined. I argue that understanding these mechanisms requires examining how intersubjectivity is built and maintained. I propose that ethnomethodological conversation analysis and the co-operative action framework provide a uniquely suited analytic orientation for this project because they focus on the fine details of the actual practical methods people use to procedurally achieve intersubjectivity. To illustrate the utility of these approaches, I show how the fine details of multimodal revoicing interactions present semiotic challenges that allow learners to link everyday and scientific concepts. Specifically, I examine the role dialogic gesture plays in reformulating a multimodally expressed idea about what it means to “go faster.”
 
|Abstract=A perpetual problem learners face is identifying which aspects of embodied experiences are relevant for appreciating the world in culturally specific ways. Vygotsky argued that social interactions with more competent cultural members provide arenas for linking everyday and scientific concepts. However, the precise interactional mechanisms of how these linkages are forged remain underexamined. I argue that understanding these mechanisms requires examining how intersubjectivity is built and maintained. I propose that ethnomethodological conversation analysis and the co-operative action framework provide a uniquely suited analytic orientation for this project because they focus on the fine details of the actual practical methods people use to procedurally achieve intersubjectivity. To illustrate the utility of these approaches, I show how the fine details of multimodal revoicing interactions present semiotic challenges that allow learners to link everyday and scientific concepts. Specifically, I examine the role dialogic gesture plays in reformulating a multimodally expressed idea about what it means to “go faster.”
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 17:49, 10 October 2019

Flood2018
BibType ARTICLE
Key Flood2018
Author(s) Virginia J. Flood
Title Multimodal Revoicing as an Interactional Mechanism for Connecting Scientific and Everyday Concepts
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Multimodality, Scientific concepts, Ethnomethodology
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal Human Development
Volume 61
Number 3
Pages 145–173
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1159/000488693
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

A perpetual problem learners face is identifying which aspects of embodied experiences are relevant for appreciating the world in culturally specific ways. Vygotsky argued that social interactions with more competent cultural members provide arenas for linking everyday and scientific concepts. However, the precise interactional mechanisms of how these linkages are forged remain underexamined. I argue that understanding these mechanisms requires examining how intersubjectivity is built and maintained. I propose that ethnomethodological conversation analysis and the co-operative action framework provide a uniquely suited analytic orientation for this project because they focus on the fine details of the actual practical methods people use to procedurally achieve intersubjectivity. To illustrate the utility of these approaches, I show how the fine details of multimodal revoicing interactions present semiotic challenges that allow learners to link everyday and scientific concepts. Specifically, I examine the role dialogic gesture plays in reformulating a multimodally expressed idea about what it means to “go faster.”

Notes