Difference between revisions of "Ekberg-etal2019"

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Latest revision as of 15:01, 30 September 2019

Ekberg-etal2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Ekberg-etal2019
Author(s) Katie Ekberg, Carly Meyer, Louise Hickson, Nerina Scarinci
Title Parents’ questions to clinicians within paediatric hearing habilitation appointments for children with hearing impairment
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, In press, Hearing impairment, Paediatric healthcare, Questions, Clinician-patient interaction
Publisher
Year 2019
Language English
City
Month
Journal Patient Education and Counseling
Volume
Number
Pages
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2019.09.015
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
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Abstract

Objective To examine parents’ questions to clinicians and how clinicians respond in paediatric hearing healthcare appointments with children with hearing loss.

Methods The data consisted of 48 video-recorded hearing habilitation appointments. Participants included 22 clinicians, 41 children, and 48 parents/carers. Data were analysed using conversation analysis.

Results A total of 89 questions from parents were directed to the clinicians in the appointments. Parents’ questions were mostly designed as polar (yes/no) questions. The questions covered several action and topical agendas, and in most instances functioned as something other than merely soliciting information. The most prominent action agenda of parents’ questions involved questions that displayed parental concern. These questions sought reassurance as well as information from the clinician.

Conclusion While parents in this study did not ask a large number of questions during the appointments their questions performed important functions. Parents’ questions cannot be assumed to be only about seeking information. Often parents’ questions are in pursuit of reassurance from the clinician about their child’s progress.

Practice Implications Clinicians may need to provide encouragement to parents to ask questions during appointments. As part of delivering family-centred care, clinicians need to be aware that their responses may need to go beyond information provision.

Notes