Difference between revisions of "Ekberg-etal2018"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Katie Ekberg; Nerina Scarinci; Louise Hickson; Carly Meyer |Title=Parent‐directed commentaries during children's hearing habilitation...")
 
 
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|Author(s)=Katie Ekberg; Nerina Scarinci; Louise Hickson; Carly Meyer
 
|Author(s)=Katie Ekberg; Nerina Scarinci; Louise Hickson; Carly Meyer
 
|Title=Parent‐directed commentaries during children's hearing habilitation appointments: a practice in family‐centred care
 
|Title=Parent‐directed commentaries during children's hearing habilitation appointments: a practice in family‐centred care
|Tag(s)=EMCA; In Press; Child health; Hearing; Hearing Problems; Audiology; Speech and language therapy; Pediatrics; Family-centred care;
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Child health; Hearing; Hearing Problems; Audiology; Speech and language therapy; Pediatrics; Family-centred care
 
|Key=Ekberg-etal2018
 
|Key=Ekberg-etal2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=International Journal of Communication Disorders
 
|Journal=International Journal of Communication Disorders
 +
|Volume=53
 +
|Number=5
 +
|Pages=929–946
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1460-6984.12403
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1460-6984.12403
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12403
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12403

Latest revision as of 18:15, 10 October 2019

Ekberg-etal2018
BibType ARTICLE
Key Ekberg-etal2018
Author(s) Katie Ekberg, Nerina Scarinci, Louise Hickson, Carly Meyer
Title Parent‐directed commentaries during children's hearing habilitation appointments: a practice in family‐centred care
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Child health, Hearing, Hearing Problems, Audiology, Speech and language therapy, Pediatrics, Family-centred care
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal International Journal of Communication Disorders
Volume 53
Number 5
Pages 929–946
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12403
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Background Family‐centred care (FCC) is recognized as best practice in the delivery of early intervention services for children with hearing loss (HL) and their families. However, there has been little research involving direct observation of family‐centred communication practices in paediatric hearing habilitation appointments, which means little is currently known about how family members are involved within appointments, and how FCC is accomplished by health professionals through their interactions with families.

Aims To examine the interaction between hearing healthcare professionals, children with HL, and their parents within video‐recorded paediatric hearing habilitation appointments (including both audiology and speech and language therapy appointments), with a particular focus on how parents were involved in the interaction.

Methods & Procedures The data for this study involved a corpus of 48 video‐recorded paediatric hearing habilitation appointments from three clinical sites (including 33 audiology appointments and 15 speech pathology appointments). Participants included 14 audiologists, 8 speech and language therapists, 41 children with HL (aged 18 months and over) and 48 of their attending family members (e.g., parents/carers). The data were analyzed using conversation analysis.

Outcomes & Results Analysis revealed one specific practice that health professionals used to engage parents in the interaction during child‐directed assessment and therapy tasks: that of ‘parent‐directed commentaries’, where health professionals shifted their attention to the parent(s) to describe or evaluate what they were observing during appointment tasks. Health professionals were observed to produce two types of parent‐directed commentaries: (1) a positive evaluation of the child's just‐prior response; and (2) an account for the child's prior behaviour (sometimes also accompanied by a positive evaluation). These commentaries appeared at systematic points in the interaction when the child had been displaying difficulty with their response to the health professional. The parent‐directed commentaries accomplished several important functions: they engaged the parent's attention in the interaction; focused the parent's attention on positive responses from the child (while shrouding less positive responses); played down potential negative perceptions of the child's previous missed/incorrect responses; and provided parents with reassurance of their child's progress during the ongoing task.

Conclusions & Implications The parent‐directed commentaries identified in this study provide an example of the practical, interactional resources that health professionals can draw on within paediatric appointments to facilitate FCC with parents.

Notes