Difference between revisions of "Ekberg-LeCouteur2020"

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Latest revision as of 12:05, 6 July 2020

Ekberg-LeCouteur2020
BibType INCOLLECTION
Key Ekberg-LeCouteur2020
Author(s) Katie Ekberg, Amanda LeCouteur
Title Clients’ Resistance to Therapists’ Proposals: Managing Epistemic and Deontic Status in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Sessions
Editor(s) Camilla Lindholm, Melisa Stevanovic, Elina Weiste
Tag(s) EMCA, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Joint decision making, Proposals, Client resistance
Publisher
Year 2020
Language English
City
Month
Journal
Volume
Number
Pages 95-114
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-43531-8_4
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title Joint Decision Making in Mental Health
Chapter

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Abstract

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), when applied to mood disorders, is designed to alleviate symptoms of depression and help clients learn more effective ways of dealing with the difficulties that contribute to their suffering. In CBT, therapists are encouraged to engage clients in a highly collaborative process in which there is joint responsibility for decision-making about therapy goals. This chapter explores sequences of interaction that involve decisions about clients’ future actions in a sample of recorded CBT sessions. In particular, the analysis compares sequences in which clients proposed their own ideas for future action with other sequences in which therapists proposed the action themselves. Clients typically resisted therapists’ proposals by indexing their superior epistemic authority in the domain of their experience, thereby invoking their ultimate right to reject the therapist’s proposed course of action. The findings highlight the complexities of implementing joint decision-making practices within therapy interactions.

Notes