CASLC talk by Professor Beatrice Szczepek Reed 3rd February 2022

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CASLCSR-2022
Type Seminar
Categories (tags) Uncategorized
Dates 2022/02/03 - 2022/02/03
Link https://bit.ly/30Y4ReK
Address Zoom
Geolocation 53° 56' 46", -1° 3' 6"
Abstract due
Submission deadline
Final version due
Notification date
Tweet .@CASLC_UoY is delighted to present a talk by Professor Beatrice Szczepek Reed, Title: The embodied design of instructions and their uptake: depictions and demonstrations in voice lessons. Date: Thursday 3rd Feb 2022, on Zoom (free registration)
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CASLC talk by Professor Beatrice Szczepek Reed 3rd February 2022:


Details:

The Centre for Advanced Studies in Language & Communication (CASLC) is delighted to present a talk by Professor Beatrice Szczepek Reed, School of Education, Communication and Society King’s College, London, UK

Title: The embodied design of instructions and their uptake: depictions and demonstrations in voice lessons

  • Date: Thursday 3rd February 2022
  • Time: 2.30pm-4.00pm (UK time)
  • Place: Zoom. If you’re on the CASLC-guest mailing list, you will receive a zoom link via google calendar. If you’re not on our mailing list, you can register for the talk by clicking on the following link: https://bit.ly/30Y4ReK

If you’re unable to use the online registration form, please contact: merran.toerien@york.ac.uk.

Abstract

This presentation investigates how participants’ bodies are engaged in the instruction and learning of an embodied skill (singing). The paper interrogates the concept of ‘depiction’ (Clark, 2016; Streeck, 2009) and introduces a distinction between ‘depictions’ and ‘demonstrations’. The two differ in their turn design and recipient uptake. Depictions reference mental concepts and are offered up for interpretation. They are embodied actions that are part of the instruction of conceptualised learnables; for example, the gestural drawing of a rising-falling shape while teaching ‘portamento’. Where recipients respond to depictions, they do so by showing understanding, for example, through nodding and/ or okay and similar response tokens. Demonstrations reference the embodied actions of others and make them accountable. They either imitate others’ previous actions or are themselves offered up for imitation. Demonstrations are part of the instruction of embodied learnables; for example, performing a gesture as part of an instruction to perform that gesture. Demonstrations implicate the body directly and make relevant responses performed through the body. The paper will present video recorded data and adopt a conversation analytic framework.

References:

Clark, Herbert H. (2016). Depicting as a method of communication. Psychological Review 123(3), 324-347.

Streeck, Jürgen (2009). Gesturecraft. The manu-facture of meaning. Amsterdam/ Philadelphia: Benjamins.

About the speaker:

Beatrice Szczepek Reed is Professor of Language and Education at King’s College London, where she is the co-director of the Centre for Language, Discourse and Communication. Much of her research is on the phonetic and prosodic features of naturally occurring talk; she has also researched crosslinguistic comparisons of language-in-interaction as well as instructional interaction. Specifically, Beatrice has worked on prosodic mirroring as a resource for sequence organization; glottalization and word linking as a resource for turn design across different languages; speech rhythm and turn taking in different varieties of English; and instructional interaction in music teaching. She has also studied language and citizenship issues for Arabic speakers in the UK. Her latest funded project is on responses to news in Arabic and English. Beatrice has published over 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals and has written the monograph ‘Prosodic Orientation in English Conversation’ (Palgrave 2006) and the textbook ‘Analysing Conversation: an introduction to prosody’ (Palgrave 2011). She has co-edited the volume ‘Units of Talk – Units of Action’ (2013, Benjamins) with Geoffrey Raymond; and the volume ‘Prosody and Phonetics in Interaction’ (2014, Verlag für Gesprächsforschung) with Dagmar Barth-Weingarten.