Difference between revisions of "Broth-etal2018a"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Mathias Broth; Jakob Cromdal; Lena Levin |Title=Telling the Other's side. Formulating others' mental states in driver training |Tag(s)=E...")
 
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|Author(s)=Mathias Broth; Jakob Cromdal; Lena Levin
 
|Author(s)=Mathias Broth; Jakob Cromdal; Lena Levin
 
|Title=Telling the Other's side. Formulating others' mental states in driver training
 
|Title=Telling the Other's side. Formulating others' mental states in driver training
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Driving; Training; Coordination; Mental states; Multimodality; Education; Ethnomethodology; In Press;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Mental states; Multimodality; Ethnomethodology; Driver training in live traffic; Coordination in traffic; Multimodal conversation analysis; Educational practice
 
|Key=Broth-etal2018a
 
|Key=Broth-etal2018a
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=Language and Communication
 
|Journal=Language and Communication
 +
|Volume=65
 +
|Pages=7-21
 
|URL=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271530918300806
 
|URL=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271530918300806
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.007
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.007
 
|Abstract=This article examines ascriptions of mental states to other road users in live traffic driver training. Through this practice, instructors formulate how others make sense of the trainee driver's car. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we demonstrate how others' side formulations support trainee drivers' communicative handling of the car during ongoing coordination events. In contrast, formulations occurring after coordination events serve educational ends, yielding the generic inferential practices by which competent drivers make contextual sense of others' actions. Therefore, others' side formulations comprise an important instructional resource for introducing neophyte drivers into the real-world theorizing, rendering traffic its orderly social character.
 
|Abstract=This article examines ascriptions of mental states to other road users in live traffic driver training. Through this practice, instructors formulate how others make sense of the trainee driver's car. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we demonstrate how others' side formulations support trainee drivers' communicative handling of the car during ongoing coordination events. In contrast, formulations occurring after coordination events serve educational ends, yielding the generic inferential practices by which competent drivers make contextual sense of others' actions. Therefore, others' side formulations comprise an important instructional resource for introducing neophyte drivers into the real-world theorizing, rendering traffic its orderly social character.
 
 
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 10:53, 9 June 2019

Broth-etal2018a
BibType ARTICLE
Key Broth-etal2018a
Author(s) Mathias Broth, Jakob Cromdal, Lena Levin
Title Telling the Other's side. Formulating others' mental states in driver training
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Mental states, Multimodality, Ethnomethodology, Driver training in live traffic, Coordination in traffic, Multimodal conversation analysis, Educational practice
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal Language and Communication
Volume 65
Number
Pages 7-21
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.007
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

Download BibTex

Abstract

This article examines ascriptions of mental states to other road users in live traffic driver training. Through this practice, instructors formulate how others make sense of the trainee driver's car. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we demonstrate how others' side formulations support trainee drivers' communicative handling of the car during ongoing coordination events. In contrast, formulations occurring after coordination events serve educational ends, yielding the generic inferential practices by which competent drivers make contextual sense of others' actions. Therefore, others' side formulations comprise an important instructional resource for introducing neophyte drivers into the real-world theorizing, rendering traffic its orderly social character.

Notes