Difference between revisions of "Bjorklund2018"

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(Created page with "{{BibEntry |BibType=ARTICLE |Author(s)=Daniel Björklund |Title=Drilling the mirror routine: From non‐situated looking to mobile practice in driver training |Tag(s)=EMCA; In...")
 
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|Author(s)=Daniel Björklund
 
|Author(s)=Daniel Björklund
 
|Title=Drilling the mirror routine: From non‐situated looking to mobile practice in driver training
 
|Title=Drilling the mirror routine: From non‐situated looking to mobile practice in driver training
|Tag(s)=EMCA; In Press; Driving; Instruction; Ethnomethodology;  
+
|Tag(s)=EMCA; Driving; Instruction; Ethnomethodology; learning; looking
 
|Key=Bjorklund2018
 
|Key=Bjorklund2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Year=2018
 
|Language=English
 
|Language=English
 
|Journal=International Journal of Applied Linguistics
 
|Journal=International Journal of Applied Linguistics
 +
|Volume=28
 +
|Number=2
 +
|Pages=226-247
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijal.12201
 
|URL=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijal.12201
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12201
 
|DOI=https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12201
 
|Abstract=This paper uses ethnomethodology and conversation analysis to trace the instructed development of a practical skill (the ‘mirror routine’) in a driving school in Sweden. Focusing the interaction between instructor and student, it applies a micro longitudinal perspective by examining five video excerpts from a total of ≈15 minutes of one driving lesson with a single constellation of student/instructor. Detailed analyses show how, by deploying different instructional resources, instructions are adapted to operate under a range of mobile and infrastructural contingencies, distinguishing between stationary and mobile instructions while considering the reflexive relation between the two. By and large, learning the mirror routine is a complex task in which the participants must deal with issues of instructions, temporality and practical multi‐activity at the same time.
 
|Abstract=This paper uses ethnomethodology and conversation analysis to trace the instructed development of a practical skill (the ‘mirror routine’) in a driving school in Sweden. Focusing the interaction between instructor and student, it applies a micro longitudinal perspective by examining five video excerpts from a total of ≈15 minutes of one driving lesson with a single constellation of student/instructor. Detailed analyses show how, by deploying different instructional resources, instructions are adapted to operate under a range of mobile and infrastructural contingencies, distinguishing between stationary and mobile instructions while considering the reflexive relation between the two. By and large, learning the mirror routine is a complex task in which the participants must deal with issues of instructions, temporality and practical multi‐activity at the same time.
 
 
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 10:17, 14 August 2018

Bjorklund2018
BibType ARTICLE
Key Bjorklund2018
Author(s) Daniel Björklund
Title Drilling the mirror routine: From non‐situated looking to mobile practice in driver training
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Driving, Instruction, Ethnomethodology, learning, looking
Publisher
Year 2018
Language English
City
Month
Journal International Journal of Applied Linguistics
Volume 28
Number 2
Pages 226-247
URL Link
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/ijal.12201
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

This paper uses ethnomethodology and conversation analysis to trace the instructed development of a practical skill (the ‘mirror routine’) in a driving school in Sweden. Focusing the interaction between instructor and student, it applies a micro longitudinal perspective by examining five video excerpts from a total of ≈15 minutes of one driving lesson with a single constellation of student/instructor. Detailed analyses show how, by deploying different instructional resources, instructions are adapted to operate under a range of mobile and infrastructural contingencies, distinguishing between stationary and mobile instructions while considering the reflexive relation between the two. By and large, learning the mirror routine is a complex task in which the participants must deal with issues of instructions, temporality and practical multi‐activity at the same time.

Notes