Difference between revisions of "Alac2005"

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{{BibEntry
 
{{BibEntry
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
 
|BibType=ARTICLE
|Author(s)=Morana Alac;
+
|Author(s)=Morana Alač;
 
|Title=From trash to treasure: learning about brain images through multimodality
 
|Title=From trash to treasure: learning about brain images through multimodality
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA;
 
|Tag(s)=EMCA;
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|Year=2005
 
|Year=2005
 
|Journal=Semiotica
 
|Journal=Semiotica
|Volume=156
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|Number=156
|Number=177-202
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|Pages=177–202
 +
|URL=http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/semi.2005.2005.issue-156/semi.2005.2005.156.177/semi.2005.2005.156.177.xml
 +
|DOI=10.1515/semi.2005.2005.156.177
 +
|Abstract=Cognitive Neuroscientists use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology to generate digital images of the human brain. An fMRI image, as a final product of the scientific work, does not document movements and sounds that were present when such an image was recorded. Yet, a focus on actual moments of scientific practice reveals that such forgotten elements of practice can play important roles in understanding and knowledge acquisition. The multimodal interaction among scientists and digital screens shows how movements of the experimental subject and the scanner noise are performed to make images meaningful. Moreover, it suggests that the phenomena whose detection is crucial for a scientific reading of the brain images, such as motion artifacts, become visible as a result of coordination of various semiotic modalities (i.e., images, talk, body movements, gesture, etc.).
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 17:41, 16 February 2016

Alac2005
BibType ARTICLE
Key Alac2005
Author(s) Morana Alač
Title From trash to treasure: learning about brain images through multimodality
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA
Publisher
Year 2005
Language
City
Month
Journal Semiotica
Volume
Number 156
Pages 177–202
URL Link
DOI 10.1515/semi.2005.2005.156.177
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

Cognitive Neuroscientists use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology to generate digital images of the human brain. An fMRI image, as a final product of the scientific work, does not document movements and sounds that were present when such an image was recorded. Yet, a focus on actual moments of scientific practice reveals that such forgotten elements of practice can play important roles in understanding and knowledge acquisition. The multimodal interaction among scientists and digital screens shows how movements of the experimental subject and the scanner noise are performed to make images meaningful. Moreover, it suggests that the phenomena whose detection is crucial for a scientific reading of the brain images, such as motion artifacts, become visible as a result of coordination of various semiotic modalities (i.e., images, talk, body movements, gesture, etc.).

Notes