Jansson2019

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Jansson2019
BibType ARTICLE
Key Jansson2019
Author(s) Gunilla Jansson, Charlotta Plejert, Camilla Lindholm
Title The social organization of assistance in multilingual interaction in Swedish residential care
Editor(s)
Tag(s) EMCA, Assistance, Care encounter, Multilingual interaction, Recruitment, Residential home, Swedish, Embodiment, Multimodal interaction
Publisher
Year 2019
Language
City
Month
Journal Discourse Studies
Volume 21
Number 1
Pages 67-94
URL Link
DOI 10.1177/1461445618814040
ISBN
Organization
Institution
School
Type
Edition
Series
Howpublished
Book title
Chapter

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Abstract

In this article, we explore the organization of assistance in multilingual interaction in Swedish residential care. The data that form the basis for the study cover care encounters involving three residents with a language background other than Swedish, totalling 13 hours and 14 minutes of video documentation. The empirical data consists of a collection of 134 instances where residents seek assistance with the realization of a practical action. For this article, three examples that involve the manipulation of an object have been selected for analysis. We use the concept of ‘recruitment’ to encompass the various methods by which assistance is sought in the care encounter. In the first example, the need for assistance concerns the transfer of an object that is recognizable and physically available for both participants. This, in combination with the resident’s gestural work that pinpoints the description of the action, facilitates its realization. In the second and third examples, the realization of the action becomes more difficult because the object involved is not recognizable for the caregiver. The article highlights the collaborative ways in which residents manage to support their talk through bodily practices, and the strong and empathetic engagement with which caregivers become involved in interpreting the meaning of these practices. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for care provision in multilingual circumstances.

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